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Opinion

  • The recent editorial concerning the need for additional funds for the Indian Land Library mentioned using the county’s “healthy reserve fund” for this purpose.

    Whether or not to use that funding is of course County Council’s decision, but I would not want your readers to think Lancaster County has a lot of money just sitting in the bank for no good reason.

    While I would call our reserve fund “adequate,” it is not healthy in the sense it is holding more than it should.

  • I have been overly impressed with the class, dignity, sportsmanship and athleticism that was displayed by the Lancaster Dixie Baseball 9-10 year old all-star team in the state playoffs in Hartsville.

    These boys are representing our town, families and themselves in a dignified, superb fashion, while not losing a game and are on their way to compete in the World Series in LaGrange, Ga.

    Congratulations to each of you young men for your hard work and fine representation of Lancaster County.

  • I am not a performing arts critic by any stretch of the imagination.

    But I felt compelled to comment on the Lancaster County Community Playhouse production of the “Jungle Book Kids.”

    My daughter, Kate, played a small part in the production.

    Those who missed this show missed something very special indeed.

    The talents of our children never cease to amaze and they were on full display in this rousing rendition of the Disney classic.

    The singing, dancing, costuming and just plain fun of this production were wonderful.

  • I spent two years in your wonderful town. When I left, I wrote a letter to the editor to The Lancaster News thanking so many who made my stay a very pleasant one.

    Recently, I was reminded of how wonderful the citizens of Lancaster are. My daughter and I were driving her car to Lancaster for a visit when a tire blew out near Rockingham. AAA helped us get back on the road.

  • On Nov. 4, voters will send either Mick Mulvaney or Mandy Powers Norell to the S.C. Senate 16 seat next year. That’s because the person who has held that seat for 16 years is giving it up.

    When Greg Gregory was elected to the Senate in 1992 he planned to serve only two terms. But after local legislators Jim Hodges and Billy Boan retired, Gregory decided to stay on to have seniority on the local delegation.

    But that’s not enough anymore to keep Gregory in the Senate.

  • Since the gas prices have gone so high, I see people on my street, Chesterfield Avenue, walking on the sidewalks more. There are more mothers pushing buggies, children riding bikes and playing along the street.

    It made me think of the days of yore. Years ago, when I was a kid, we played on the street in our neighborhood until the street lights came on and our mothers called us to come home.

    It seemed more like a neighborhood back then. We knew about everyone on our street.

  • A.R. Rucker Middle School had quite a school term for 2007-08. The school, located in east Lancaster, had what might be hailed as a “blue-ribbon year.”

    The school captured its second Red Carpet award, honoring Rucker for its family-friendly environment.

    The school also won the traveling trophy as the top school fundraiser for the 2008 Relay for Life campaign, which aids in the ongoing fight against cancer.

    Rucker’s Red Carpet Award marked the second time since 2004 it has garnered recognition from the state Department of Education.

  • I recently visited the animal shelter. It was not a trip I was looking forward to, yet one I had to make. I went because as a member of the Humane Society it is now my job to list all pets in the shelter. We list them so we can give these little ones a small chance at life.

    The animal control officer on duty asked me to take a seat and said he would get me the list. He told me there would be more animals in the pens than were on the list. He was getting ready “to put them down,” the terminology used for killing them. It was a job he said he didn’t like.

  • We always hear so many negative happenings and negative outcomes. So, it was a joy for me to be in Pittsburgh for the U.S. Transplant Games from July 11-16, where hope and positive energy abounded.

    Along with 29 members of Team South Carolina, there were 19 donor families, five living donors and many support family members, totaling 121.

    Lancaster was represented by two athletes, Ed Heins and Amy Saylors. We again realized what a small world this is when we saw Brenda Pogue and her granddaughter, Sierra Young, from Lancaster, a donor family.

  • Like a lot of people in Lancaster County I have been out of work for more than a year. We apply left and right for jobs. The majority of the jobs have to be applied for online. That’s OK. I understand that. The problem is the potential employers.

    For example, I applied at a local department store. I applied online just like they asked. After completing the application, I was asked to schedule an appointment, which I did. When I went for my appointment, the computer was down.

  • If you’re an avid bicyclist, you’re probably aware of the new law that state lawmakers passed in June – the Bicycle Safety Act. The law has won praise from cycle enthusiasts in the state, such as Charleston attorney Peter Wilborn of www.scbikelaw.com, who has called the new law “state of the art.”

    That’s especially noteworthy because South Carolina isn’t a state known for being a leader for the legislation it passes.

  • I have to admit since the first of July we’ve had some tragic news to report. A retired police officer was shot while trying to help accident victims. A Pageland man was sentenced to 30 years for the death of an epileptic man whose body was dumped in Heath Springs.

    Then there was the shooting death of the owner of the Cedar Creek Bait and Tackle Shop. The shooter took refuge in his home and fired off some shots before taking his own life.

  • As a retired state employee, I was bewildered to read Mick Mulvaney’s July 4 column “Trading short-term benefits for long-term security is wrong.” I could not believe that he did not better understand how public pension plans work. They pay benefits out of the assets of the retirement system, not tax money, and they use the average of the good years and the not so good years in deciding how much to pay retirees.

  • We are going to repeat a few things we said very recently, but we think, thankfully, an ongoing issue has finally come to the correct conclusion.

    We think the dual office ban in the state’s Constitution is a good thing, but it has, sometimes, unfortunate implications.

    It is no guideline or recommendation. It is actually not just a law. It is a provision of the state’s constitution. The ban says no person can hold two offices “for honor and profit.”

  • Cairnes made child’s day by giving her a fishing rod

    I would like to share this with the family of Ronnie Cairnes. My daughter, Alyssa, went fishing with my husband, Freddie, her sister, Adrien, and me on May 18. Alyssa caught a huge bream. We stopped by the Cedar Creek Bait & Tackle, showed it to Ronnie and asked if he could help up put a picture of her and her fish in a magazine. He said he couldn’t. Instead Ronnie gave her a fishing rod – the first one she ever had. Alyssa loved it and it made her day.

  • Even in the toughest of times, there’s always something to celebrate. And while these may not be the toughest of times (anyone who lived through the Great Depression or World War II would tell you those times were much tougher), these are certainly not the best of times.

    The national economy has slowed, and gas prices are at historic highs, with some experts predicting the national average for unleaded regular gasoline will break the $5 mark this year.

  • This letter is addressed to the medical professionals doing business in the Lancaster area, but it should be of interest to other folks, as well.

    In reading newspapers, watching TV and listening to AM radio lately, it has become apparent that many things are occurring in this city, state and country that should be of concern to everyone.

  • A few weeks ago, I sent a letter to the editor criticizing Rep. Mick Mulvaney for opposing a ban on alcohol inhalers (devices that turn liquor into a mist so that it can be inhaled into a person’s lungs, getting them drunk quickly).

    As the victim of a drunken driver, my point was that we don’t need any devices that get people drunker faster because who knows how many of them will end up behind the wheel of a car.

  • I am responding to the story “Schools get s $4.5 million from feds” in the July 16 edition of The Lancaster News. The grants are to be used to reduce alcohol use, foster more physical activity among students and encourage them to go to college.

    Grants are those gifts from Washington that don’t have to be paid back. Apparently they come like manna from heaven.

  • Family Promise of Lancaster County would like to thank Darlene Hallman and the Red Hat chapters who gave their time and energy to plan and run a Chinese auction to benefit Family Promise.

    We would also like to thank everyone who came to the auction. Family Promise has been gaining momentum over the past two months with getting into the community and sharing our information with as many people as we can.