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Opinion

  • Indian Land High School’s Warrior Stadium takes center stage tonight.

    The IL arena will serve as host for the annual Founders Federal Credit Union Kickoff Classic.

    In addition to Founders, The Lancaster News and Carolina Gateway serve as media sponsors for the game.

    All four county teams will be involved in the jamboree, which likely will draw the largest crowd to ever see an athletic event at the county’s smallest high school.

  • It’s hard to believe that summer is over for county schoolchildren. While autumn doesn’t officially arrive until next month, tomorrow morning thousands of Lancaster County students will say goodbye to the carefree days of summer and return to the classrooms.

    Last week, teachers began getting their rooms ready for their new students. Their planning and preparation will pay off as they welcome the students back. Many students will be sporting new clothes and shoes and carrying new lunch boxes and backpacks full of new school supplies.

  • When I turned on the TV and saw our beautiful county courthouse on fire, I thought I was watching Detroit burn like we’ve seen in the past when people get angry at the justice system or law enforcement. But I never thought I’d see that here. The arsonist cannot be from here. Our community has too much pride and love for our town and community.

  • I would like to respond to Nancy Jones’ letter “Book sense great, but experience gets job done” in the Aug. 17 edition of The Lancaster News. Jones was referring to a letter written by Shemika Caldwell. Caldwell said education was more important than work experience and cited the city’s administrator position as an example.

    In that same edition was a picture of my graduating class from the Annie Mae Dream Center program. There were students and instructors in the class. The instructors were identified as students. Caldwell was one of my instructors.

  • Lancaster County Courthouse holds a lot of memories for a lot of people. But if someone could get in there that easy, what would have kept a terrorist from entering and putting a bomb in there and blowing it up during court and killing a lot of people. Someone had a lot of nerve.

    Security should have been better, even a guard could have been posted.

    A lot of lives could have been lost if a terrorist had gotten in and planted a bomb.

  • I just returned from out-of-town, to learn that Jack Harper passed away Saturday night.

    So much of Lancaster’s commercial district has disappeared and unfortunately, those who were so vital, are now passing from the scene also.

    Jack was a life long friend who, at one time, operated a shoe store at Lancaster Square.

    Prior to that, he was with Bailey-Rowell on Main Street. Jack outfitted many children and probably dyed more wedding shoes than anyone else. He was a fixture in the uptown business community.

  • In his letter to the editor he spewed accolades about the mayoral candidate he was supporting. It was an impressive letter – neatly typed, well-written and punctuated correctly.

    And while there have been so many advancements in the field of genetics I had a problem believing the 6-month-old had written the letter. Not that I doubted his intelligence, it’s just that I had a problem visualizing his little fingers pounding away at a computer’s keyboard.

    Yes, campaigning for the previous election was in full swing.

  • Several weeks ago, a great man who loved his Lord and Savior was taken too quickly from his family and friends. Life as well as death must come eventually to all. It is what we do during those gaps in time that matter the most. I would like to share some things about Donnie Threatt that I will always remember. I want to also share some things that I learned about Donnie after his passing.

  • I would like to respond to Shemika Caldwell’s letter “Writer: Education more important than work experience,” in the Aug. 13 edition of The Lancaster News.

    Let me say from someone with both education and work experience, I simply don’t agree. Miss Caldwell’s perspective has nothing to do with education or experience. Her letter itself and in her own words reveal her views are from a discriminating mindset and of personal bias.

  • The buildings and parcels of land on Main Street tell the story of early life here in Lancaster. What the people of Lancaster already understand is that when you tear up, knock down, burn and change the landscape, you are tearing up the future as well.ee

    The courthouse is on the Historic Register. It is part and parcel of Lancaster history. When you tear the fabric of a city’s past, you tear out the souls of its citizens as well. When the people can no longer can feel the soul of the city then they go elsewhere. That is the greatest loss a city can have.

  • I, as many others, not only in the local area but also throughout the nation, am heartsick over the violation of our courthouse. I only hope the person or persons responsible for this loss can be found. And when that is accomplished, I have no idea how flexible the sentencing guidelines are for crimes of this nature. However, I think it would really be appropriate to force this arsonist to assist in the restoration of this beautiful, historic building. Under heavy supervision the arsonist should be assigned the bulk of the work.

  • I wanted to comment on Jenny Hartley’s column in the Aug. 8 edition of The Lancaster News.

    Having worked in law enforcement and the electric utility industry, I understand being on the scene in a coffee-deprived and groggy state of mind.

    If I had been there I would most likely have laughed out loud if I had been asked the location of the Lancaster County Courthouse. Sorry, I can’t always be diplomatic – sometimes I’m just human.

  • We know hindsight is 20/20. We were reminded last week how painful it often is to learn from a mistake that has given us that crystal-clear perspective.

    Our beautiful, 180-year-old courthouse was severely damaged by a fire set by an arsonist during the early morning of Aug. 4. When we learned of the fire, we sighed, “Oh, no, not our courthouse!”

  • On July 24, my family said goodbye to my 18-year-old son, a United States Marine, as he departed Camp Lejuene for Iraq. This would be the first of at least two deployments he will make.

    As expected, this was an emotional day. I expected sadness, but didn’t expect the many other emotions I felt that day.

  • The Lancaster County Art League is an organization that supports the arts in Lancaster. We have had workshops every month except in the summer for more than 40 years.

    Every year we put our art work in the Springs Hospital Gallery on the second floor. Last year two of Dianne Mahaffee's beautiful paintings were stolen.

    They were her spider lilies collections. One photo was three spider lillies and the other was a single lily.

  • nning for my City Council District 6 seat this term.

    After 12 years of service, I feel that now is a good time for me to step down. I have learned a lot during the past years about city government and I appreciate the opportunity you have given me to serve on council.

    I would like to encourage each of you in the following areas:

    n Pray for your leaders. I truly appreciate those who have prayed for me.

    n Encourage your leaders. I received a letter from a gentleman thanking me for my service and he enclosed $10 to buy my lunch. Thanks a million.

  • This summer will be forever marred by memories of the cowardly burn-and-run actions of what appears to be an ax-to-grind arsonist.

    The late-summer burning of the Lancaster County Courthouse and an ensuing fire at the nearby solicitor’s office will be the major headlines when this dark period is revisited in years to come.

    On a much more positive note, the effort of some Lancaster County youngsters at nearly the same time as the fires provided us something to be proud of this summer.

  • Yes, the courthouse must be repaired. It would be a grave disservice to the brave citizens of Lancaster, who 143 years ago turned Sherman's hoard of criminals away from Lancaster and spared the courthouse, not to repair it. These citizens of Lancaster were not regular army, but a local militia of young boys and old men who stood their ground against a trained army. To repair the courthouse and make it the museum of Lancaster would be the supreme honor to these men.

  • I lost a piece of home early Monday. When my iPhone rang just after 8:30 a.m. with my mom’s photograph on the display, I knew it couldn’t be good. She never calls at that time of the morning for no reason.

    “I just wanted to tell you before you heard it anywhere else,” I heard her say, and I braced for what was to come next. “The courthouse here is on fire, and the roof has already collapsed. When you walk out the front door, you can smell the smoke.”

  • The bulk of the American Legion summer baseball spotlight usually falls on the Post 31 senior baseball team simply because of its seniority.

    The senior team has fielded a squad since the mid-1940s, while the junior team is in its fourth campaign.

    No matter, the junior team stole the Lancaster Legion baseball spotlight this season.

    The junior team, under the leadership of second-year head coach Michael Anderson, made Lancaster Legion baseball history. The juniors, who finished second in the League V regular-season race, earned a first-ever bid to the state tournament.