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Opinion

  • My husband has been in the hospital four times since December. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Springs Memorial Hospital for going the extra mile to make sure he had the best of care.

    First, we would like to thank Lancaster County EMS for its prompt and wonderful service. We would like to thank the doctors for the knowledge and their extra effort to diagnose and treat my husband.

  • Editor’s note: The following is See Lancaster’s response to Gil Small’s Feb. 24 letter, “Santa Train event was a disappointment.”

    Dear Gil, Nancy and Anne:

    On behalf of the Santa Express and the city of Lancaster, I want to thank you for your letter and comments. Please note that we work hard each year to provide an exciting and memorable experience for our fine city and community.

  • Winning a state championship is special. Winning two state championships is extra special.

    That’s just what happened at the Class A-AA state wrestling tournament in Rock Hill late last month.

    Buford High School senior 130-pounder Rashad Cunningham capped a 46-1 mat season, winning the state title in his weight class.

    Indian Land’s Trevor Jones, in the 140-pound weight class, did the same as he captured the state crown.

    Both wrestlers achieved the ultimate goal for a high school wrestler in exciting fashion.

  • A local developer got his way with the city of Lancaster last week. Just as area residents of Arrowood Estates were in an uproar about the annexation of four neighboring properties and the slim reality of their own annexation, a very real deal was quietly completed for a property across town.

  • Jobs. Jobs. Jobs. That’s the hot topic of discussion. Over the past 10 years, we have lost close to 10,000 jobs with the closing of Springs Industries. This has caused great hardship on the local citizens as they scramble to find a replacement for their lost income.

    The Lancaster County Economic Development Corp., Lancaster County Council, the city of Lancaster and all of the employment agencies have been working overtime to attract new industries to our county. This is not an easy task, but we continue to go after all those that show an interest in moving here.

  • A recent front page article said teachers are going to have take one day off with no pay. It is wrong to furlough school teachers for even one day. School teachers have committed their working careers to teaching in public schools. Many of them could have gone into better-paying jobs, but they have chosen to teach the young people in our schools.

  • The Carolina Thread Trail is in its visionary stage now. How it will develop – even if it will develop – isn’t entirely clear now.

    But the vision calls for a trail that connects locations in 15 counties in both Carolinas that are popular with tourists, hikers and nature lovers.

    Andrew Jackson State Park and Forty Acre Rock preserve, both in Lancaster County, and Landsford Canal State Park, which is situated in both Chester and Lancaster counties, could be destinations included in the Thread Trail.

  • I have had the pleasure of getting to know Rob McCoy over the last few months. I could tell from the moment I met him that he was an honest, good-hearted person. Rob is also the type of person to stand up for what he believes in and voice his concerns. When he announced that he would be running for the South Carolina House in District 44, I knew that he was the right man for the job. Rob is a proven leader and true conservative. He served for six years in the National Guard and has been an active participant in the TEA Party movement in Lancaster County.

  • On Feb. 23, Lancaster City Council discussed the annexation of properties on Charles Avenue in Arrowood Estates. City Council wanted to get these properties annexed into the city to start a domino effect that would eventually encompass the entire estate. The vote ended the right way, with a no vote taking the majority. But the way these meetings went were far from comforting.

  • The Senate has been in session now for about five weeks, or roughly 15 legislative days. In that time, a lot has happened – at least for the Senate.  

    First off, things move much more slowly in the Senate than the House. Some say this is because the Senate is a more “deliberative body.” That may be. More likely, though, the difference is due to the filibuster, which permits a single senator to bring a particular bill to a halt.

  • I am writing in response to Lynne Carrroll’s sarcastic and misleading letter, “Spratt should focus on jobs for constituents,” in the Feb. 12 edition of The Lancaster News. The author said she was absolutely infuriated because Congressman Spratt and a delegation of members of the House Budget Committee had traveled to Afghanistan.

  • This time next year when the 2011 Lancaster County high school spring sports season rolls around, facilities at county schools will be improved. The upgrades can’t come quick enough.

    Much-needed restroom facilities are scheduled upgrades for softball and baseball fields at the county schools.

    Those improvements can only make attending games at those designated sites that much better.

  • In the next week you should be getting a Census questionnaire in the mail. The form has 10 questions and is estimated to take 10 minutes to fill out.

    After the official Census kickoff in January, we encouraged everyone to fill the form out and make sure everyone in their household is counted. We outlined the critical reasons then for completing the form and will reiterate them.

  • If you want to find out how long it takes for a publicly funded Emergency Medical Services crew to respond to a call in South Carolina, forget it. It’s secret.

    An obscure state law, passed some years ago at the request of the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), casts a blanket of secrecy over all EMS information.

    State Sen. Harvey Peeler, R-Gaffney, is working hard to fix the problem and amend the current law, but now another secrecy issue has come up.

  • I read Stanley Smith’s column last week attacking S.C. Sen. Mick Mulvaney. As I was on Lancaster County Council at the same time as Smith, I thought I may be in a good position to point out the many, many things he was wrong about.

    First, let me point out that I am a friend of Mick Mulvaney. I have known him for several years and spent time with him and his family. I have seen him at work in this community. I worked to help get him elected to the state Legislature and am working to help get him elected to the U.S. Congress.

  • I am writing to express my delight at an experience I had at a Lancaster restaurant recently.

    My family and I were returning from an exhausting trip to Louisiana, and, having flown into Lancaster County Airport, were eager to go and get something to eat. We arrived at one of our favorite restaurants, Bo-Thai on S.C. 9, only to discover that we had missed their lunch hours by a few minutes.

    While we were standing at the door, the gentleman inside, who I presume was one of the owners, opened the door and invited us in.

  • Lancaster County Council is moving in the right direction to get the county untangled, to some degree, from the Edenmoor development in Indian Land.

    Last week, council decided to proceed with the condemnation process, a legal step necessary for the county to get its due – an Emergency Medical Services station and a 68-acre park.

    Both the EMS station and the park were supposed to be given to the county as part of the development agreement for Edenmoor, which is situated on 800 acres off U.S. 521 between Jim Wilson Road and S.C. 75.

  • Lancaster County Auditor Cheryl Morgan received quite a nice surprise when she attended the S.C. Association of Auditors, Treasures and Tax Collectors’ annual meeting Feb. 5.

    Morgan had no idea she was the recipient of the highly regarded L.H. Sonny Siau Award of Excellence.

    “I was totally surprised,” said Morgan, who was touched by the honor. “I just cried. It was really emotional.”

    The coveted award is named in honor of the former auditor of Georgetown County.

  • I wish to tell you how much I appreciated our paper delivery man on Saturday, Jan. 30.

    I looked out the window and saw him pull up to our paper box and I thought to myself “the paper will have to stay until the weather clears up.”

    Then he got out of his car and started toward our home.I tried to meet him at the door, but couldn’t move fast enough. He knocked as I was trying to meet him.

  • When I think of America and what it means to me, I have to pause and collect my thoughts because it means so much more than hot dogs, parades, bands, balloons and fliers.

    It means more than the fancy speeches that politicians always seem to come up with, although they rarely know anything about the way most Americans live.

    To me, America means the right to live my life just as I choose. It means I have the right to vote or not to vote, the right to walk down Main Street in my sandals and shorts or ride down Main Street in my Cadillac.