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Today's Opinions

  • Staff Column: Becoming part of the solution for abused, neglected animals

    Wagging tails and heavy breathing meet me at the door every day when I get home from a long day at the newspaper.
    I drop my bag and keys on the counter and try to take a seat on the couch. A 50-pound pit bull jumps up on my lap, wagging her tail wildly and smiling like it’s her favorite place in the world.
    It seems she’s been waiting on me for an eternity.

  • Staff Column: Becoming part of the solution for abused, neglected animals

    Wagging tails and heavy breathing meet me at the door every day when I get home from a long day at the newspaper.
    I drop my bag and keys on the counter and try to take a seat on the couch. A 50-pound pit bull jumps up on my lap, wagging her tail wildly and smiling like it’s her favorite place in the world.
    It seems she’s been waiting on me for an eternity.

  • Staff Column: Becoming part of the solution for abused, neglected animals

    Wagging tails and heavy breathing meet me at the door every day when I get home from a long day at the newspaper.
    I drop my bag and keys on the counter and try to take a seat on the couch. A 50-pound pit bull jumps up on my lap, wagging her tail wildly and smiling like it’s her favorite place in the world.
    It seems she’s been waiting on me for an eternity.

  • Column: Community newspapers nationwide are adapting to survive

    There was a tough but mostly accurate headline on a recent Associated Press story: “Decline in readers, ads leads hundreds of newspapers to fold.”
    But as usual, the headline didn’t tell the whole story.
    The story had a strong central basis, the research of Penny Abernathy and her colleagues at the University of North Carolina. She reported in October that about 1,400 U.S. cities and towns lost newspapers from 2004 through 2015.

  • Column: Norman: Disabled 1st responders deserve lifetime tax-exempt status

    There are people among us who make sacrifices. People who pay the ultimate price not for prestige, power or glory – but for strangers in need.
    Sometimes, these men and women are found abroad or on our military bases keeping us safe. Often, they are found right next door. These are our first responders, our neighborhood heroes who go to work every day with the full knowledge that they might not return home.
    Nationwide in the second half of 2018 alone, nearly 700 first responders were permanently disabled or killed in the line of duty.

  • Letter: I hate to lose my Rite Aid

    Is it true that Rite Aid will be closing in a few weeks, the one on Main Street?
    I am a big user of Rite Aid, especially for medicine. I know big business does not care about the little guy, but I hope it’s not true. Rite Aid is very important to the downtown area.

    Larry Cohen
    Lancaster

  • Editor's Column: Memories of a textile fortress that couldn’t withstand attack

    I walked the site of the demolished Lancaster Plant on Thursday, searching for the spot where the county historical society found Leroy Springs’ tomb last month.
    It saddened me so. The World’s Largest Cotton Mill, reduced to piles of bricks and concrete slabs. Soil stained dark, weeds head-high. Only a few houses still stand in the mill village, and most of those are boarded up. The vacant lots are overgrown and trashy.
    I stood there in the sun and the breeze and closed my eyes, remembering the place in its prime.

  • Column: Are S.C. officials shirking oversight of state payouts to private groups?

    In 2006, lawmakers approved spending $700,000 in the fiscal 2007 state budget to help the private Erskine College establish the John Drummond Center for Statesmanship – to be named after the longtime senator who retired from the legislature in 2008.
    A budget proviso authorizing the funding required the Abbeville County liberal arts college to give a written report to the House Ways and Means and Senate Finance committees and the then-state Budget and Control Board on how it spent the state funds.
    That apparently never happened.