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Today's Opinions

  • Residents should have voice at meetings

    I am writing about John Baker's proposal to Lancaster County Council to prohibit naming government buildings after living individuals.

    I am amazed that Wayne Kersey is too arrogant to think more deeply into the matter. Mr. Baker has done his homework and pointed out that in naming government buildings could result in embarrassment. Let's suppose Mr. Kersey is protecting the possibility of having his name on a building.

  • Anti-cockfighters seek to take away rights

    This is directed to every South Carolinian and American from every walk of life – whether you are a school teacher, housewife, public official, politician, CEO, animal rights activist, animal fighting proponent, retiree, vegetarian, meat lover, city slicker or country bumpkin.

    I am disgusted by all the hoop-lah being stirred up by the cockfighting raid in York County on Super Bowl Sunday. All the preaching that ensued about toughening the law because of all the "horror, cruelty and bad things" that supposedly goes on during cockfights.

  • Woman asks for return of photos in stolen billfold

    Woman asks for return of photos in stolen billfold

    On Feb. 12, my billfold was stolen out of my purse at the Family Dollar Store in Kershaw at 513 S. Hampton St. My billfold was gray in color with two zippers on each side.

    The billfold and the money are really of no value to me. But the pictures of my family are my world.

    Since I lost my son in 1995, I have very little left of him except the pictures that were in my billfold.

  • Initial opinion of Mulvaney wrong

    I was disappointed when Mick Mulvaney won S.C. House District 45 in 2006. Today, I feel that it is necessary that I salute Mulvaney because he has proven my initial judgment wrong.

    All too often, we voters are left in the dark while lawmakers make decisions that affect us. We may get a newspaper article or a news segment to keep us informed. Yet, voters are usually left to wonder "what are those lawmakers thinking?"

    Mick, thank you for providing your constituents with an explanation of your voting record.

    Heather Mullins-Teasley

    Lancaster

  • Focus is on healthy hearts

    In case you didn't know, tomorrow is Valentine's Day. The day set aside to recognize those who hold a special place in your heart.

    It is also a good time to check the health status of your own heart. After all, February is American Heart Month. And appropriately so. What better time to focus on the most vital human organ than during the month of love?

    The American Heart Association says that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States.

  • Overwhelming support for Saylors benefit

    Overwhelming support for Saylors benefit

    The family and friends of Amy Saylors would like to extend a most heartfelt thank you to everyone who participated in the "Save Amy" barbecue benefit held on Jan. 26.

    The tremendous amount of time and energy provided by all of the volunteers was nothing short of phenomenal.

    We did not expect such an overwhelming response to this event.

    Simply put, the people of this wonderful community proved once again how willing they are to reach out and help someone in need.

  • It's the heart that really matters

    Sitting in the musty smelling living room, I looked around at the aging duct tape and hardened carpenter's glue that I used over the years to hold together this fragile, cement-block, 1930-something house.

    It's a small, two-bedroom, 600-square feet abode that my grandmother, Brennie Love, having lived there since 1939, insisted that she would remain in until she dies.

  • Former Gov. Hodges 'man of the people, giant among men'

    Former Gov. Jim Hodges is one of South Carolina's greatest citizens. He is the type of leader who puts right ideas and right actions ahead of his own political well being.

    During his term as governor of South Carolina he wisely removed the Confederate flag from the state capital dome, signed the bill that recognized Martin Luther King's birthday as an official holiday and ended the legalization of the video poker industry which had plagued the weak and poor of his state even though he knew this would create political and economic ammunition for his powerful rivals.