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Today's Opinions

  • Letter: Heath Springs health fair was fun and informative

    On April 27, I had the opportunity to take my son to the town of Heath Springs’ Health and Wellness Fair. We were invited by friends in Heath Springs.
    I was thoroughly impressed with the number of vendors, the health screenings, and events focused on the health of both adults and children.  

  • Column: Town owns YMCA building in Fort Mill

    This is a response to a Fort Mill YMCA member whose column appeared in the May 8 paper.
    As the concerned citizen outlines, we have received several inquiries concerning the water temperature at the Fort Mill YMCA at the Complex. Throughout this process, we have communicated through email with any new information.

  • Letter: More north-south roads needed in county to handle growth

    Last week’s headline reads “Mega-sports complex at Lennar project?”  
    The article reads, “For several months, county leaders have been trying to find a suitable tract near the U.S. 521 corridor between Lancaster and Indian Land for a large sports complex with fields for baseball, football, soccer and lacrosse, as well as a gym.”
    This Indian Land resident says, “No more U.S. 521 destination buildouts.” We are at gridlock and southern county leaders don’t give a squat, as long as Indian Land remains their cash cow.

  • Staff Column: Becoming part of the solution for abused, neglected animals

    Wagging tails and heavy breathing meet me at the door every day when I get home from a long day at the newspaper.
    I drop my bag and keys on the counter and try to take a seat on the couch. A 50-pound pit bull jumps up on my lap, wagging her tail wildly and smiling like it’s her favorite place in the world.
    It seems she’s been waiting on me for an eternity.

  • Staff Column: Becoming part of the solution for abused, neglected animals

    Wagging tails and heavy breathing meet me at the door every day when I get home from a long day at the newspaper.
    I drop my bag and keys on the counter and try to take a seat on the couch. A 50-pound pit bull jumps up on my lap, wagging her tail wildly and smiling like it’s her favorite place in the world.
    It seems she’s been waiting on me for an eternity.

  • Staff Column: Becoming part of the solution for abused, neglected animals

    Wagging tails and heavy breathing meet me at the door every day when I get home from a long day at the newspaper.
    I drop my bag and keys on the counter and try to take a seat on the couch. A 50-pound pit bull jumps up on my lap, wagging her tail wildly and smiling like it’s her favorite place in the world.
    It seems she’s been waiting on me for an eternity.

  • Staff Column: Becoming part of the solution for abused, neglected animals

    Wagging tails and heavy breathing meet me at the door every day when I get home from a long day at the newspaper.
    I drop my bag and keys on the counter and try to take a seat on the couch. A 50-pound pit bull jumps up on my lap, wagging her tail wildly and smiling like it’s her favorite place in the world.
    It seems she’s been waiting on me for an eternity.

  • Column: Community newspapers nationwide are adapting to survive

    There was a tough but mostly accurate headline on a recent Associated Press story: “Decline in readers, ads leads hundreds of newspapers to fold.”
    But as usual, the headline didn’t tell the whole story.
    The story had a strong central basis, the research of Penny Abernathy and her colleagues at the University of North Carolina. She reported in October that about 1,400 U.S. cities and towns lost newspapers from 2004 through 2015.