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Today's Opinions

  • Column: Trail money not enough to construct fire stations

    The current proposal by District 4 county council member Larry Honeycutt to reverse the Unified Development Ordinance requirement that subdivision builders along the path of the Carolina Thread Trail fund its construction is shortsighted and misguided.
    Indian Land needs more recreation opportunities for its fast-growing population, not less. Mr. Honeycutt’s conclusions that we can better use trail money to build fire stations and libraries is ludicrous on its face.

  • Column: Consultant fees soar in nuclear facility fiasco

    Since the 2017 collapse of the V.C. Summer nuclear project – which the legislature made possible through a quietly passed law 10 years earlier – lawmakers and state utility regulators collectively have spent at least $729,000 on consultants hired to give them advice or issue reports.

  • Letter: Look for creative solution on trail

    Lancaster County friends and neighbors, it is unacceptable for county council to reduce our strong Carolina Thread Trail policy in the UDO down to just “the developers offering easements.”
    There are too many alternatives and too many nuanced questions to consider. Is the developer a large corporation or a small business? Is it more feasible for a paved trail or a natural path? Should the county or the neighborhood HOA be responsible for maintaining it? There is a creative, cost-effective solution.

  • Column: S.C. broadens what qualifies for criminal expungement

    No one wants to go through a lifetime being penalized for something they did wrong when they were 18 or 20 years old.
    Imagine you’re 35, 40 or even 50, with children and a family, and you have never been able to get a good job with wages sufficient to support yourself or your loved ones. All because your criminal record keeps you locked in the past.
    S.C. law offers an expungement process that removes items from a person’s criminal record, restoring hope and a second chance to those who have made mistakes in the past and paid their debt to society.

  • Letter: Thanks to partners in Shoebox for Seniors

    In December 2018, the Lancaster County Council on Aging sponsored its annual Shoebox for Seniors project. The response is always amazing, thanks to a whole lot of people in Lancaster County.
    Everyone who participates in this project puts a lot of time and love into the gifts that they give, and the seniors who receive these gifts appreciate them more than you will ever know. The gifts are given to the seniors who receive home-delivered meals and to those who come to our senior centers for lunch and activities.

  • Letter: Help me with book on Preston Blackmon

    I just recently moved back to Lancaster. I was born and reared here by my parents, the late Rev. Preston Blackmon and Wilma Myers Blackmon. I graduated from Lancaster High in 1975.
    Truly, there is no place like home.
    Since last year, the spirit of the Lord has placed it in my heart to write a book about my dad. He is, of course, no stranger to the city and county of Lancaster, having made so many contributions here in his lifetime.

  • Column: County GOP keeps gaining local offices

    Thanks to Lancaster County voters, 2018 was the fifth election in a row where Republicans gained offices in Lancaster County, continuing the trend that began with the historic election of former Congressman Mick Mulvaney.
    In less than 10 years, a county that was once a key Upstate Democratic stronghold is now one of the most Republican in South Carolina.

  • Column: Let’s stick with the UDO as is, protect Carolina Thread Trail

    Lancaster County is about to undo one of the most progressive actions this county has undertaken. Our own lawmakers are considering changes to the Carolina Thread Trail Overlay District.
    Most Lancaster County residents are unaware of the treasure that is contained in the Unified Development Ordinance (UDO), which was passed in 2016. It includes a zoning overlay for the Carolina Thread Trail requiring that if a property is part of the master plan, then the developer is responsible for building the trail.