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Today's Opinions

  • Column: Why aren’t cell signals blocked in prisons?

    For years, S.C. officials have repeatedly tried – and failed – to convince the federal government to allow jamming of signals in prisons from contraband cell phones routinely used by inmates.
    But officials haven’t worked nearly as hard to try to persuade wireless carriers to voluntarily block their own signals in prisons, which, according to corrections officials, the companies are permitted to do. It is against federal law for states or local governments to do it.

  • Column: The inherent risk of specialization in school sports

    One of the responsibilities that parents take most seriously is protecting their children from injury, whether it is buckling seat belts or strapping on a bike helmet.
     And when their kids become teenagers and want to participate in sports or other activities, parents do everything they can to keep their sons and daughters from getting hurt.

  • Column: Panhandle town proponents, just leave the rest of us alone

    Were you surprised with the outcome of the March 27 vote on Indian Land becoming a town – 1,853 yes votes and 9,086 no?
    Many of us who voted against incorporation could not believe over 1,800 voted for the proposed town.
    Why were many of us opposed? Well, it was more dealing with the unknown rather than knowing what to expect if it should pass.
    The big unknown was what the yearly tax bill would be. Those living in subdivisions such as Sun City did not wish to have another bill each year in the form of a city tax.

  • Letter: Indian Land ‘no’ voters, take note of Lancaster County’s tax trouble

    In last Sunday’s front-page article about Lancaster County’s inexplicable drop off in property tax collections, council member Billy Mosteller says: “We aren’t talking $10,000. We are talking millions.”
    I hope all of you who voted “no” on Indian Land becoming a town are satisfied with the current situation.

    Jules Giglio
    Indian Land

  • Letter: Band plays song honoring Howard

    The Rock Hill All Star Band played a song last Friday during a performance at Lancaster’s Moose Lodge to honor the late Mayor John Howard.
    “I Won’t Back Down” is a classic rock song written by Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne in 1989. It was first performed by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. After the 9/11 attack, it gained a lot of additional airplay and came to be the song that spoke to the “spirit resolve” of the U.S. military.

  • Column: Lots of costly consulting on nuclear fiasco

    Three out-of-state consulting businesses hired by the S.C. legislature to provide “advice” on the V.C. Summer fiasco have submitted bills totaling more than $230,000, though only one firm has produced a written report.
    To put the $232,379 public tab in some perspective, it could cover the failed nuclear project portion of about 8,600 monthly bills for typical South Carolina Electric & Gas residential customers, based on 1,000 kilowatt hours used in a month.

  • Column: Background, mental checks on 1st Amendment tools as well?

    In his April 25 guest column, Rudy Falkenberg suggests that we need to place limits on ammunition, since a firearm without ammunition is no more useful than a club.
    I suggest that we should accept the liberal position, first espoused by English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839, that “the pen is mightier than the sword.” This being the case, should we not then apply to the tools of the First Amendment (i.e., pens, pencils and keyboards) the same constraints that the liberals seek to impose upon the tools of the Second Amendment (i.e., firearms and ammunition)?

  • Letter: I was wrong on Randy Newman

    When I’m wrong, I admit it.
    Solicitor Randy Newman, I should have realized you would be the best man for the job. You had the best sixth-circuit solicitor, Doug Barfield, showing you the ropes before you ran.
    You have done everything you said you would do, plus more. I think we all in Lancaster should be proud of you.
    I voted for William Frick, but I’m now glad you won. Being older does not necessarily mean you’re the best.
    You’re young and have great ideas for helping our town and the court system. And you’re doing it.