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Today's Opinions

  • Letter: Signs are necessary during elections

    As we go into the election season, campaign signs begin to bloom along the roadsides. Although they don’t resemble the wildflowers you might prefer to see there, they are a time-honored means for candidates to let voters know they exist and that they would appreciate the voters’ support. 
    South Carolina law says candidates have a right to put them there as long as they remain on the highway right-of-way and don’t invade anyone’s personal property without permission.

  • Letter: Let’s learn lessons of overdevelopment

    I may be a carpetbagger with little right to write this letter but, then again, I bring with me an eyewitness account as to what can happen with overdevelopment.
    Having read of the massive developments proposed off U.S. 521, I need to sound the alarm. Up North you can see every federal highway with miles of strip malls and developments. Scarcely a tree still stands.
    Now that I am here, living in the biggest development of all – Sun City Carolina Lakes – I see more coming.

  • Column: Mormon church creates IL ward

    Aug. 12 was an exciting day for local members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, as the church created its very first ward in Indian Land.
    A “ward” in the Mormon church is similar to a congregation in other religious organizations and represents a specific geographic area. A ward usually consists of about 500 members.
    On that same day, a new Fort Mill Stake was created. A “stake” is similar to a diocese in other religious organizations and represents several wards.

  • Column: Don’t dismiss criticism of FDR policies in Depression

    In his most recent column, Keith Grey took exception to Chandler Norville’s characterization of FDR’s New Deal policies.
    I suggest that Mr. Grey should take the time to read the very detailed analysis contained in “FDR’s Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression,” published in 2003 by Jim Powell, a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, a Libertarian think tank.

  • Letter: Stranger goes out of his way to be kind

    On Friday, Aug. 24, I dropped my wallet at the ATM on Airport Road. Arriving home, I realized it was missing and returned to the ATM, but I could not find it.
    When I got back home, a large, beige truck was coming up my road. The driver pulled over to my mailbox and said, “Your son-in-law (my next-door neighbor) has your wallet.”
    I was so upset about losing it and having it found that I thanked the young man again and again, but let him drive away without knowing his name.

  • Column: Why James Smith is one of my favorite candidates for governor

    I wish I could remember the moment, like I can so vividly with Henry McMaster, when I first became impressed by James Smith. I can’t.
    I don’t have a store of great stories about him. I can’t even recall the first time I met him.

  • Column: Let’s shed tribal labels, all live our best values

    I am responding the Aug. 24 guest column by Chandler Norville headlined “I fear that young conservatives will get lost in a sea of liberals.”  
    As an American, I resent labels that do nothing more than divide and keep us from listening to each other. The Democrats I know are great proponents of fact-based policies.
    Mr. Norville might be surprised to learn that my beliefs include liberal, moderate and even some conservative ideas. I do not have anything against conservative values well-lived, nor do I wish to take these values from anyone.

  • Publisher's Column: Publishers exhale as federal agency rejects unjustified newsprint tariffs

    There was great relief and much celebrating at newspapers across the country Wednesday when the International Trade Commission voted unanimously not to impose permanent tariffs on the North American newsprint supply.
    The paper markets serving community newspapers nationwide can soon begin to move back to market pricing without the heavy hand of government imposing taxes on the primary suppliers of newsprint.