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Today's Opinions

  • S.C. salaries should be based on responsibilities

    In South Carolina, the number of state employees is established in relation to the state’s population. In 1994, the state’s population was about 3.7 million and the state appropriated funding for about 42,000 full-time employment (FTE) positions, nearly 95 percent of the annual limitation.

  • Family appreciates show of support

    My wife, Rosa White Johnson, and I, Sammie Surrell Johnson, moved from Lancaster in 1966 to Summerville, near Charleston.
    We both retired from Charleston Air Force Base, but Lancaster will always be home for us. We both grew up in Lancaster, married and two of our three children were born in Lancaster.
    As her mother grew older and her quality of life deteriorated, my wife, being an only child, tried to come up at least twice monthly to make sure that her needs were being met. Other days, she called her on the phone.

  • Jackson, wife lived high life on others’ money

    Former Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. has negotiated a plea deal with the government, in regards to his misuse of campaign funds.
    He’ll have to pay back money, about $100,000, and is supposed to do some jail time. I wouldn’t hold my breath on that, though.
    It seems he used the money to fill up his house with furniture, bought himself a $40,000 Rolex, and paid travel expenses for a woman he described as a “social acquaintance.” Does that social acquaintance have a pimp (or a financial director?)

  • Is Washington determined to close down postal service?

    Looks like folks in Washington are bound and determined to disband our postal service. It’s been working for more than 200 years in wars and all kinds of weather. Why, our politicians spend more money “investigating” than they do in “fixin’” stuff.
    There is talk about the pension for postal employees, which cannot be changed because of Congress. I guess it’s goodbye to home delivery of mail if we wait for Congress to fix the problem.

  • Educational choice is already working in S.C.

    There’s no question that people like having options. It’s simple, but true. In everything from smart phones to shoes, people take for granted the ability to choose products that fit their needs and personality.
    That same desire for choices applies to larger, more vital goods and services.

  • Honest government is essential to all of us

    The world has finally discovered South Carolina. Those of us who live here have known it all along: No other place has the beaches, mountains, salt marshes, temperate climate, forests, wildlife and fertile farmlands that we do.

  • S.C. schools seek the right formula

    We’ve heard the excuses about why South Carolina schools are so far behind others in the nation.
    And, to be honest, many of the excuses are valid.
    But that doesn’t take the sting out of the recent report that shows, despite all the effort and goal-setting to make South Carolina’s schools more accountable, we still are lagging way behind.
    The S.C. Education Oversight Committee reported that goals established for the year 2020 may not be met unless there are drastic changes in the way we educate our students.

  • Mulvaney explains his No Budget, No Pay vote

    Late last month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the No Budget, No Pay Act, which, among other things, temporarily extended the nation’s debt ceiling. The Senate followed suit, and the president signed the bill into law. 
    I voted for the bill. Here’s why:
    For the past two years, many of us in the House (some more than others, unfortunately) have been trying to draw attention to the alarming condition of our nation’s debt, our record deficits and the out-of-control spending in Washington.