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Our View

  • Staff Column: Becoming part of the solution for abused, neglected animals

    Wagging tails and heavy breathing meet me at the door every day when I get home from a long day at the newspaper.
    I drop my bag and keys on the counter and try to take a seat on the couch. A 50-pound pit bull jumps up on my lap, wagging her tail wildly and smiling like it’s her favorite place in the world.
    It seems she’s been waiting on me for an eternity.

  • Editor's Column: Memories of a textile fortress that couldn’t withstand attack

    I walked the site of the demolished Lancaster Plant on Thursday, searching for the spot where the county historical society found Leroy Springs’ tomb last month.
    It saddened me so. The World’s Largest Cotton Mill, reduced to piles of bricks and concrete slabs. Soil stained dark, weeds head-high. Only a few houses still stand in the mill village, and most of those are boarded up. The vacant lots are overgrown and trashy.
    I stood there in the sun and the breeze and closed my eyes, remembering the place in its prime.

  • Editor's Column: Heath Springs, please get your act together

    It’s time for Mayor Eddie Moore and the other elected officials of Heath Springs to stop the madness and start obeying the law.
    The town’s dispute with its longtime landscaping contractor has resembled a slow-motion car wreck over the past couple of months. Every time we think the car is finally skidding to a halt, it hits another curb and flips up in the air again.

  • 2 preachers prone to smiles, prayers

    The shout, “Well Glory!” marked the life of Curtis Cameron just as bazookas and Bibles left an imprint on W.C. Wallace.
    We lost them – two of the county’s best-known ministers – in the past few days.
    Cameron, 85, died at his home March 22 and Wallace, 93, died Tuesday.
    I have been thinking about the legacy that they left us.
    At a small community newspaper, we don’t just write about folks. We really know them.

  • Editor's Column: Linda Blackmon in charge? Inhale…exhale

    Thanksgiving dinner in our family involves serious logistics, workflow management, food-safety expertise, communication skills and social-host savvy. It’s a hefty production trusted to people who know what they’re doing.
    One relative leads the effort – usually the person whose roof it’s under – but there’s always a plan B in case that person is under the weather or gets sidetracked by some emergency. If needed, the No. 2 steps in – someone with the skills to keep the big event going on short notice.

  • Staff Column: It’s time to lay wreaths on the graves of our vets

    Given the latest weekend weather forecast, I’ll probably leave Kershaw on Saturday a lot wetter than when I arrived.
    But some things – such as honoring those who served our country – are worth an hour in the rain.
    At noon Saturday, I plan to join a handful of Kershaw volunteers in a holiday salute to military veterans buried at the city cemetery on Kirkland Avenue as part of National Wreaths Across America Day.

  • Our View: Let’s support the rec bond, create a better place to live

    If you’re like 78 percent of Lancaster County residents, you live in an owner-occupied dwelling, which probably means you have a mortgage or had one in the past.
    Borrowing to buy a home is a normal part of American life. Almost no one saves up for 30 years, then buys a house for cash. We would rather live in the house as we pay for it. Life is just more pleasant that way, for us and our families, and that’s one of the benefits of living in a country with a well-established system of borrowing for long-term needs.

  • Editor's Column: Fear of another Hugo makes us shudder

    If you are old enough to remember the night Hurricane Hugo sucker-punched this part of the state 29 years ago, you’re probably spending today telling people how horrible it was.
    And you’re warning them not to ignore the predictions about Florence, the 500-mile-wide Category 4 storm pointed straight at the Carolinas coast. Landfall is expected late Thursday.

  • Publisher's Column: Publishers exhale as federal agency rejects unjustified newsprint tariffs

    There was great relief and much celebrating at newspapers across the country Wednesday when the International Trade Commission voted unanimously not to impose permanent tariffs on the North American newsprint supply.
    The paper markets serving community newspapers nationwide can soon begin to move back to market pricing without the heavy hand of government imposing taxes on the primary suppliers of newsprint.

  • Editor's Column: Reviving Mayor Shaw’s hangout, the Ellen Dean

    We learned this week that an investment group plans to buy White Street’s old Ellen Dean Hotel and rehabilitate it for some new purpose.
    Hallelujah! For us and for the family of the late Mayor Joe Shaw. The Ellen Dean was his home base for many decades, and Charlotte and Joe Jr. have been trying to sell it since he died in 2015.
    And on today’s front page, we’re breaking the news that the vacant Kimbrell’s building a block away on Main Street has been sold.