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Columns

  • Column: Money for a few key lawmakers’ favorite projects

    State Reps. Bruce Bannister and Dwight Loftis, both Greenville Republicans, want $5 million in state funding to help build a convention center in downtown Greenville.
    Bannister says it would house a large art collection that had been displayed at the private Bob Jones University.
    Rep. Leon Stavrinakis, D-Charleston, who has donated to the nonprofit South Carolina Aquarium, says he wants $1.5 million in state money to move power-generating equipment at the Charleston aquarium to higher ground.

  • Column: Solutions on Carolina Thread Trail require creative ideas from all sides

    A guiding principle of the Carolina Thread Trail is “respect for the land and respect for the landowner.” It seeks to work with property owners to respect the wishes of all landowners along potential trail corridors, and we share those values in our own work in conservation and trail development.

  • Column: Budget report: Teacher raises, state college tuition freeze

    With the large education-reform legislation moving out of the House, work in the House will now turn to the 2019-20 state budget.
    The House Ways and Means Committee has been working over the last two months on the state’s budget for the upcoming year. While I don’t serve on Ways and Means, I have been attending these meetings to keep on top of important issues, as well as voicing my concerns to those who sit on that committee.

  • Column: Gathering stories about what makes Kershaw special, where it should go

    KERSHAW – On Feb. 16, in honor of Valentine’s Day, Kershaw Heart & Soul held a free pancake breakfast at Kershaw Elementary School to start the story-gathering phase of its community-building initiative.
    The crowd included town council members Mike Cook, Gail Rogora and Sonya Poole along with Town Administrator Mitch Lucas.  
    The breakfast was held to engage with residents and dig deeper into finding out what matters most to the community of Kershaw. We asked attendees what they love about Kershaw, and what they would change about it.

  • Column: MUSC brings Lancaster its track record of excellence

    What an exciting week we just had at both MUSC Health Lancaster Medical Center and MUSC Health Chester Medical Center.
    It is an honor and a privilege that our communities are able to join this prestigious health-care organization, MUSC Health.
    MUSC Health is the No. 1 hospital system in South Carolina, as ranked by U.S. News and World Report. Its education, research and evidence-based care are nationally and internationally recognized.

  • Column: It’s time for spring cleaning to put our best foot forward

    Spring is just around the corner. It’s time to start thinking about spring cleaning, and as I ride the streets here in Kershaw, there’s plenty of cleaning needed.
    In my earlier days, I had the opportunity to travel across our country through many towns large and small, from one-stoplight towns to major cities. I remember we commented on most all of them, giving them a thumbs up or thumbs down based on their appearance.

  • Column: Voting by mail would save time, money

    After deciding to vote early in last year’s election, my wife and I stood in line for more than three hours at a Charleston shopping center early-voting facility. The first hour was spent huddling in line under an umbrella to ward off the rain.

  • Column: Why I support the president’s declaration of emergency on the border

    Any American who has turned on their TV or glanced at a newspaper over the past few weeks knows that border security and maintaining our national sovereignty have been at the top of the news.
    This debate has raged on for years, for decades even. But as the matter at hand has become a crisis, the actions we take now are more important than ever.

  • Column: Limit teens’ access to e-cigs

    Vaping. How bad is it?
    The creation of electronic cigarettes quickly captured the hearts and minds of young impressionable teens. But what exactly are electronic cigarettes, and how are they used?
    E-cigs were created for adults who desire to stop smoking but not quit cold turkey. E-cigs are battery-operated and fueled by pods, which contain a mix of nicotine and other chemicals. Each pod is equivalent to a pack of cigarettes, and many teens go through a pod or two a day.

  • Column: Little research to say if e-cigarettes are safe

    A question that has come up recently regarding American healthcare is whether e-cigarettes should be available for teenagers.
    A majority of middle school and high school students have access to these devices, and there has been an increase in the use of them over recent years. With a wide range of different types of e-cigarettes, scientists know little about these devices, which have only existed for about 15 years.