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Columns

  • Column: Baseball has the magic to refine us through sportsmanship, hard work

    Good sportsmanship is a virtue. Like most virtues, it requires a certain amount of self-restraint.
    A good sport forgoes instant gratification for that which is more lasting. A good sport sacrifices personal glory for that which sustains the team. Perhaps more important, good sportsmanship requires grace. Grace enough to bear defeat without complaining and to enjoy victory without boasting.
    Fans have lived through March Madness, and the national championship in football has been won. And now baseball, the great national pastime, is in full swing.

  • Column: S.C. producing many excellent political leaders

    What a wonderful time to be a South Carolinian. I wanted to take this opportunity to thank our representatives and point out the amazing jobs they are doing.
    There are people in this country who look down on those of us who live in the South, and South Carolina is often included. However, when you see the quality of representatives we send to Washington and Columbia, I believe that clearly demonstrates the type of citizens we are and the expectations we have for those who represent us.

  • Column: Pace of other bills quickening with House budget behind us

    This week was another busy one in the House, as we enter the closing stretch of the General Assembly session.
    Here’s what we’ve been up to, including legislation that I’ve sponsored.

    Bills sent to the Senate
    With the House budget in the hands of the Senate, the pace of other legislation has increased, including these bills that received final House passage this week and moved on to the Senate:

  • Column: Lawmakers debate how to spend surplus

    The 124th General Assembly has convened in Columbia to take up the people’s business in the first year of the two-year session. The slate is wiped clean from last session, so all matters not resolved then must start over.
    In addition, Gov. Henry McMaster has begun serving a new term along with all House members. After spending most of last year addressing the debacle of the failed V.C. Summer nuclear power project, the issues on the front burner this year are education reform and increasing teacher pay. Following are details on those matters and others before us.

  • Column: Congress should up protections for whistleblowers, reporters’ sources

    Each day, journalists throughout the country are working tirelessly to inform their readers what the government is up to.
    The free press is one of the most important pillars of American democracy. By reporting the truth, reporters allow the citizenry to elect leaders who represent their values and ideals and craft laws and policies that they believe in.

  • Column: Things I’ve learned to never do

    In my 74 going on 75 years, there are many things I have learned through experience that you just do not want to do.
    Do not eat ice and crunch it up. You just might break off your tooth doing this. Then you might swallow that tooth while eating a salad. I did this. It felt like a piece of glass in the salad, but it was my cracked-off tooth.
    If you have a pretty little bobcat kitten come to your back porch, do not start feeding it. It seems tame enough. You think you can take it in the kitchen and make this pretty little thing your housecat.

  • Column: Thanking those who got Kershaw new library site

    In 2014, voters approved a sales-tax increase that provided $8 million to make much-needed improvements to the three library branches in Lancaster County.
    Recently, county council voted unanimously to purchase the Wells Fargo building in Kershaw so the library could be moved to the center of downtown, providing a location that will be safer and more convenient for the Kershaw area.
    I would like to acknowledge the people who helped make this possible.

  • Column: FDR failed to pack high court, and Democrats will fail today

    The frustration of some in the Democratic Party has been manifest this year as they try to gain traction by packing the U.S. Supreme Court and changing the Constitution.
    Flush with victory when their party took control of the U.S. House in the November 2018 election, these Democrats have proposed some radical changes that they now see will go nowhere as long as the president and the Senate can block their extreme left ideas.

  • Column: Why does state disguise who’s really in charge?

    When it comes to debt, the state of South Carolina is swimming in billions of it.
    Yet an important report on the state’s finances, issued by Comptroller General Richard Eckstrom and considered a key document by credit rating agencies in evaluating state debt, paints a misleading picture of South Carolina’s government structure and authority over state agencies.

  • Column: Officials move toward selling Santee Cooper

    Last week the S.C. House made historic progress toward protecting South Carolina ratepayers and taxpayers. With Senate and House joint resolutions, consensus is building to sell the state-owned utility Santee Cooper.
    The House authorized the Public Service Authority Evaluation and Recommendation Committee to analyze bids to purchase the utility.
    A special legislative committee, comprised of four House members, four Senate members and the governor, started researching the potential sale of Santee Cooper eight months ago.