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Columns

  • Candidate Column: I have the education, experience to be county’s next probate judge

    My name is Dee Studebaker. I have been Lancaster County’s associate probate judge for almost two years. I immediately filed to run for probate judge when filing opened at noon March 16 because I am serious about gaining your trust.
    I have the skills, education and experience necessary to serve you as probate judge, and I feel called to public service.  I’ve had the privilege over the past two years to assist and observe the court’s operations while earning the trust and confidence of other personnel and citizens.    

  • Column: Here's how House voted to distribute tax revenues

    The S.C. House last week passed its $8.2 billion version of the state’s general fund budget, sending it to the Senate.
    Our state’s economy is booming, with low unemployment, continued business growth and a thriving tourism industry, so South Carolina brought in $326 million more than it did the year before in recurring dollars that can be used on yearly expenses.
    Here’s a look at what the House did:

    Required expenditures

  • Column: ‘Home’ – with its allure, baggage – is a distant place we cannot return

    I waxed nostalgic for the “good old days” after reading Professor Emerita Dianne T. Evans’ guest column in the March 9 paper.
    I grew up in the late 1940s and the decade of the ’50s, but my experiences occurred more than 600 miles north of Lancaster County. I too remember a time when we prayed to God for guidance, saluted our flag, were taught American history and respected our elders.
    Everyone respected authority, almost everyone.

  • Column: Mass killings show need for transparency in government

    Less than a week after the massacre at Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., 16 news outlets and organizations filed a motion with the court overseeing the prosecution of the shooter, arguing that hearings and records in the case should be open to the public.

  • Column: Foolish stupidity! Do NOT transmit your nude photos!

    I would like to make two points in regard to the news article in the March 16 paper entitled “Rep. Norrell: Make ‘revenge porn’ illegal.”
    Point one: Foolishness. As Mark Manicone reported in his article: “According to the Data and Society Research Institute, one in every 25 Americans have been affected by revenge porn and one in 10 young women have been threatened with the public posting of explicit images.”

  • Column: Where were all the ‘no’ voices during ILAC fights with county?

    The group of “no” voters surprises me. They say incorporation will destroy Indian Land. They don’t want to pay more taxes. They want to save the farmland.
    I have never seen any of this group in front of county council with the Indian Land Action Council speaking against the county raising our taxes. I have never seen any of the group at the Planning Commission meetings with ILAC, asking developers for 50-foot undisturbed buffers or connectivity through developments for better traffic flow.

  • Column: IL town folks like the Borg on ‘Star Trek’

    Van Wyck and Indian Land have lived together as Panhandle communities for more than 100 years, sharing a great life and history. My family is rooted in Van Wyck, and that history has provided a great many stories, love and pride for our family. 

  • Column: New, affordable way to create a right-sized town

    There have been many suggestions that a town of Indian Land can’t be run on a budget of under $8 million per year. I understand how people with a long history around bloated government bureaucracies would believe that’s impossible. However, they are either unaware (or don’t want to admit) that there is a new way to create towns that breaks the traditional mold.

  • Column: Leave our farm out of your city

    My name is Kevin Hall, and my wife and I are in our 11th year of farming at Hall Family Farm, the u-pick strawberry and pumpkin farm on U.S.  521 two miles north of the state line, on land that has been owned by the family for nearly a century. Recent events within the family led to the impending sale of the property.

  • Column: Let’s envision our library of the future

    What is the library of the future?
    Does it have shelves with new releases and up-to-date periodicals tempting you as soon as you walk in the door? Is it an “on ramp” to the information highway with broadband internet access for all and book borrowing directly to your Kindle?
    Can it be a place where local data is stored and shared widely so that everyone has access to important information about the future of our community? Or is it a gathering place with a coffee shop and a place for community meetings?