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Columns

  • Column: County GOP keeps gaining local offices

    Thanks to Lancaster County voters, 2018 was the fifth election in a row where Republicans gained offices in Lancaster County, continuing the trend that began with the historic election of former Congressman Mick Mulvaney.
    In less than 10 years, a county that was once a key Upstate Democratic stronghold is now one of the most Republican in South Carolina.

  • Column: Let’s stick with the UDO as is, protect Carolina Thread Trail

    Lancaster County is about to undo one of the most progressive actions this county has undertaken. Our own lawmakers are considering changes to the Carolina Thread Trail Overlay District.
    Most Lancaster County residents are unaware of the treasure that is contained in the Unified Development Ordinance (UDO), which was passed in 2016. It includes a zoning overlay for the Carolina Thread Trail requiring that if a property is part of the master plan, then the developer is responsible for building the trail.

  • Column: Why I back long-overdue education reform

    Seldom does being the youngest member of the General Assembly give me insights that my colleagues lack, but as the legislature begins work on education reform, youth gives me a unique perspective on this important undertaking.
    I have seen firsthand the changes our school systems have gone through in the last two decades, and I understand what makes our schools great but also where we have failed. This is why I support House Bill 3759, the South Carolina Career Opportunity and Access for All Act.

  • Column: Magistrates on short leashes with ‘holdover’ status in effect

    In South Carolina, state senators largely control the selection of more than 300 county magistrates, who handle thousands of relatively minor criminal and civil cases annually.
    That power is amplified when magistrates finish their terms without being reappointed, a period known as “holdover” status in which they can serve indefinitely – and potentially feel more pressure to please their local senators.

  • Column: GOP must explicitly condemn obvious racism of Steve King

    Over the past two years, Republicans have focused on spreading opportunity, and it has paid dividends.
    From the creation of opportunity zones in some of our nation’s most distressed communities to amazing job-creation statistics and low unemployment rates, there’s no doubt that the future is brightening for many Americans.

  • Column: A night of high-flying hoops, fun for a cause: Fatherhood

    In three weeks, the Lancaster Fatherhood Project will hold its signature fundraising event of the year, and today I’m asking for your help and participation.
    Our mission is to help men become responsible, engaged and empowered fathers. While we work to strengthen men, the real beneficiary of our program is their children, their other relatives and our entire community.
    We are Lancaster County’s only nonprofit that provides a holistic approach to self-assessment, goal-setting and responsible fatherhood in a peer-group setting.

  • Column: U.S. agency tries to limit FOIA access

    The U.S. Interior Department is trying to make it more difficult for any citizen to request open records, and the National Newspaper Association has joined 39 other news organizations to oppose this.
    The department, which includes such agencies as the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has proposed rules changes for how it administers the federal Freedom of Information Act.
The changes would make it harder for journalists and other citizens to get information.
    The proposal would:

  • Column: Animals have more rights than unborn child in womb

    Two stories have captured the attention of many Americans in the past few days: a new law on abortion in the state of New York, and a law proposed in the U.S. House that would make cruelty to animals a felony, punishable by up to seven years in prison.
    I’m sure that I am not the only one who sees the apparent irony of those two news stories.

  • Column: Hold officials criminally liable for not enforcing immigration law

    When did our local, state and federal representatives get delegated authority to hand this country over to illegal alien immigrants?
    A few states give many benefits to people here illegally, like welfare, college benefits, food stamps. There are elected civil officers who want to maintain the status quo and allow as many aliens as possible to gain entry into America by any means available.

  • Column: S.C. lawmakers probably will fill long-open PSC seat with insider

    After nearly a year and a half of delays, state lawmakers are poised to fill a $107,822 Public Service Commission seat with either an incumbent who voted for electric rate hikes for the failed V.C. Summer nuclear project, or a former longtime commission staffer.