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Columns

  • Column: Need tighter controls on vaping in schools

    As a high schooler, I witness every day how far vape and electronic cigarettes addictions reach into the community of students.
    Hidden in the sleeves of the students' sweatshirts, e-cigarettes are easily concealed for use in class and during lunch. Students race to their cars after school to “hit” their Juuls.

  • Column: Vandalism at Deliverance church a blow to dedicated faith leaders

    When I first heard about the vandalism of the lovely little Deliverance Word of Faith Church, I felt shock, then anger, then deep sadness.
    I struggle to understand why anyone would want to commit such a hurtful and totally senseless act. What possible benefit could someone gain from breaking beautiful stained-glass windows and destroying the other hard-earned church property that these dedicated pastors and their congregation had worked so hard to put there?
    The wound goes beyond the physical damage to the church and strikes at the heart. 

  • Column: Too early to OK medical marijuana

    A handful of S.C. legislators have made it clear they intend to again push for legalized marijuana in South Carolina.
    They have also made it clear they intend to have this debate as though it were a medical issue by making physicians the singular access point for the “marijuana drug.” There is one substantial problem. None of them have bothered to ask physicians if we support such measures. We do not.

  • Column: It’s the state, not the county, with that pot of unclaimed cash

    I’ve been contacted recently by a lot of Lancaster County residents about the state’s Unclaimed Property Program, which has over $650 million of unclaimed assets belonging to S.C. residents who, for some reason or another, can’t be contacted.
    The Lancaster News reported last month that this program has more than 1,700 accounts of unclaimed funds worth $500 or more that belong to Lancaster County residents.

  • Column: Come on, David, leave some newspapers for the rest of us

    About 10 miles from home, on the way to David Knight’s house, I decided to pick up The Lancaster News on Feb. 17.
    But to my amazement, at every rack I went to, there were no papers to be found. Another guy that was also looking to buy a newspaper told me he thought it was because David Knight had bought all the newspapers he could get his hands on! Possibly to give them to all of his extended family, relatives and friends all over the United States and other countries.

  • Column: Agency favors bill that would up its revenues

    The S.C. Commerce Department has paid $2.9 million since fiscal 2015 to a state-created nonprofit that listed $69 million in net assets as of June 30 and now wants lawmakers to double its main funding source.
    Asked for specifics on the money paid to the Columbia-based S.C. Research Authority, Commerce spokeswoman Alex Clark said the department and SCRA have been “involved in a number of partnerships over the last several years,” including:

  • Column: This Saturday, learn how to make a difference in our neighborhoods

    You can make a difference.
    Back in 2008, Forbes Magazine published a list of the top ten most distressed towns in America, and Lancaster topped the list. The outcry from the community was loud and urgent. In fact, “We Are Lancaster” signs can still be found dangling from fence posts and buildings scattered about town.

  • Column: Consultant fees soar in nuclear facility fiasco

    Since the 2017 collapse of the V.C. Summer nuclear project – which the legislature made possible through a quietly passed law 10 years earlier – lawmakers and state utility regulators collectively have spent at least $729,000 on consultants hired to give them advice or issue reports.

  • Column: Trail money not enough to construct fire stations

    The current proposal by District 4 county council member Larry Honeycutt to reverse the Unified Development Ordinance requirement that subdivision builders along the path of the Carolina Thread Trail fund its construction is shortsighted and misguided.
    Indian Land needs more recreation opportunities for its fast-growing population, not less. Mr. Honeycutt’s conclusions that we can better use trail money to build fire stations and libraries is ludicrous on its face.

  • Column: S.C. broadens what qualifies for criminal expungement

    No one wants to go through a lifetime being penalized for something they did wrong when they were 18 or 20 years old.
    Imagine you’re 35, 40 or even 50, with children and a family, and you have never been able to get a good job with wages sufficient to support yourself or your loved ones. All because your criminal record keeps you locked in the past.
    S.C. law offers an expungement process that removes items from a person’s criminal record, restoring hope and a second chance to those who have made mistakes in the past and paid their debt to society.