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Columns

  • Guest Column: Critique of my name-calling ignores facts that back it up

    As I read Wednesday’s column regarding opinions versus facts by Dianne Evans, I had to somewhat agree.
    However, when I read the following – and I quote – I was a bit perplexed: “When one has no facts to contradict intelligent disclosure, one easily gives way to name-calling. Name-calling – such as “deplorables,” “racists,” “homophobic,” etc. – should be recognized often as an easy way to respond to an argument when one knows no logical way to refute its claims.”

  • Guest Column: Update: Roads my Facebook posters want to know about

    South Carolina’s fuel tax has increased by a total of 6 cents over the last three years. Hopefully, the cost seems justified now that resurfacing projects are seen in every direction.

  • Guest Column: College president million-dollar club growing in South Carolina

    As the new University of South Carolina president, Robert Caslen likely will be paid far more than the $650,000 salary that was reported after the school’s board of trustees hired him to run the state’s biggest university.
    Caslen, a retired Army lieutenant general and former West Point military academy president, succeeds the retiring Harris Pastides, whose total annual compensation, according to his latest income-disclosure statement, was nearly $1.15 million.

  • Guest Column: Opinions need not always be linked to facts

    This is an opinion page. Here, readers are invited to share their opinions with others – as we do with boldness.
    Opinions, for the most part, are based on feelings, beliefs and attitudes. Opinions are not necessarily fact-based. Nor do they need to be. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinion, and in a free society we honor freedom of speech.

  • Guest column: America needs a much shorter presidential election season

    It’s just August, with 15 months before the next U.S. presidential election, and the campaigns are in full swing.
    Are you tired of this yet? If you are, there is an answer: we should start moving toward a new schedule for the 2024 election.
    First, we should examine our present system and review our objectives. The reason we have presidential elections periodically is to allow the citizens to evaluate the operation of government and decide on the person who will lead us for four years, largely based on what they say they stand for.

  • Guest column: Creating a place that draws us back

    When we started this summer internship focused on the future of Lancaster’s downtown, we were not terribly optimistic at first.
    It seemed a task too big for three “Simterns” (interns at the J. Marion Sims Foundation) to handle. Plus, we’re long-term residents of this area, and almost all we can remember about downtown is more of the same.

  • Guest Column: Key element of road safety: Obey the rules in work zones

    The Lancaster News recently observed traffic problems resulting from the many road construction projects taking place in our county.
    The other day, I drove through four work zones across Lancaster County, starting on S.C. 903 and ending in Indian Land on U.S. 521. With the increase in road funding, we can expect to see a lot more work in the years to come – all of it helping bring much-needed relief to our long-ignored road needs.

  • Guest Column: Do we want America’s children to model themselves on Trump?

    This is in response to William St. Louis’s letter of Aug. 3. In it, he deplores the outbreak of racism that has come out of the closet since the candidacy and inauguration of Donald Trump as president.
    I am writing this letter to honor my parents. My father drew himself up by the bootstraps out of a poverty-stricken childhood, joining the Army, going to Harvard and Virginia medical school on an Army scholarship. The insecurities of his childhood did not prevent him from becoming one of the best internists in his area, and he lived to serve others.

  • Guest Column: Navigating utility crisis is key to S.C. energy future

    Two years ago, South Carolina received the worst financial news in its history.
    Santee Cooper and its partner SCE&G were abandoning construction of two nuclear reactors in Fairfield County, leaving the utilities $4 billion and $5 billion in debt, respectively.
    For most of the following two years, the utilities battled their critics who opposed ratepayers being made to pay any of the nuclear debt. Most believe the debacle resulted from the utilities’ poor management decisions, public deceit and possible criminal behavior.

  • Guest Column: Trump’s rants convince me he is a racist

    Generally, successful protests for changes in government policies come from the bottom. Citizens gain strength through a groundswell of protests that finally convince Congress to change course.