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Today's News

  • Craft Stand bringing specialty coffee shop back to downtown

    Downtown Lancaster is getting its first specialty-coffee shop in half a decade, as The Craft Stand broadens its usual offerings to include perkier brews starting Monday morning.
    The Main Street craft-beer retailer and gathering spot will be serving coffee drinks from 7 until 11 a.m. Monday through Saturday.
    “It will be basic in the beginning,” owner Brandy Geraghty said. “We will have drip and an espresso machine to make lattes and cappuccinos and I don’t know what else because I haven’t learned yet.”

  • City widens area for take-home police cars

    Lancaster City Council has approved the city police department’s request to increase the geographic area where officers are allowed to take their police vehicles home with them at the end of their shifts.
    Under the new policy, officers living within a 30-mile radius of the police department will be able to take their assigned vehicles home with them. The previous policy applied only within the borders of Lancaster County.
    The vote was 5-1 at Tuesday night’s council meeting, with Linda Blackmon dissenting.

  • Man charged in theft of money, checks from business drop box

    A Lancaster man turned himself in to authorities May 4 on charges that he fished checks and cash out of a business mail slot last month.

    Phillip Perry Craig of McIlwain Road in Lancaster was charged with second-degree burglary after he was identified on surveillance video from local business Lancaster Financial.
    The thefts at Lancaster Financial began in February. The incident Craig is charged in occurred April 9. Craig was a customer of the business.

  • S.C. receives millions under tobacco settlement

    The state is receiving millions of dollars as part of its yearly share of settlement funds stemming from the anti-smoking wars of the 1990s.
    S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson announced the state has secured $81.1 million in its annual share of funds under the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement (MSA), approved by the courts in 1998.
    “These payments are incredibly important to the taxpayers of South Carolina, because they mean the tobacco companies are repaying the state for some of the costs related to smoking,” Wilson said.

  • Mom follows her kids’ lead, now they’re karate kinfolk

    Some mothers shop and dine with their daughters, but Kathy Faulkenbury spins and spars with hers.
    Two to three times a week for almost four years, Faulkenbury and her daughters have dressed out in martial arts uniforms, practiced and sweated together and advanced through the ranks.
    This past Thursday night, she and her middle daughter, MaryJoe, 11, were presented with their black belts at Kenaki Karate in Lancaster.

  • Column: Uniting to help those with mental illness

    In these times of deep division in our country, I would like to point out something that we Americans have in common.
    One in five U.S. residents – across all social classes, races, religious beliefs, genders and ages – lives with some form of mental health condition in a given year. It is so common that it’s becoming an epidemic.
    Despite this fact, there is still stigma associated with having a diagnosis of a mental health condition.

  • Commentary: Scott: Here’s how to ignite job creation and aid towns like Lancaster

    Editor’s note: Sen. Scott testified Thursday before the congressional Joint Economic Committee on the benefits that Opportunity Zones, passed in last year’s federal tax reform bill, will have on distressed communities across the country. In March, Gov. Henry McMaster selected nearly all of the city of Lancaster as two of the state’s 135 Opportunity Zones. The program makes those areas eligible for tax incentives to encourage business creation. Here are excerpts of Scott’s testimony:

  • Column: It’s vital to be ‘in the room where it happens’ these days

    In the second act of the hit Broadway musical “Hamilton,” the Aaron Burr character expresses his jealousy at being excluded from – and his desire to get into – the meetings that his rival Alexander Hamilton participates in where major decisions are made to plot the course of the new United States.
    “I wanna be in the room where it happens,” Burr sings.

  • Column: Thief keeps donated food from those who need it

    It would seem to be the perfect crime. A petty crime for sure, but a crime nonetheless. After all, the items I left out I expected to be gone at some point.
    This past Saturday, the U.S. Postal Service and United Way held the Stamp Out Hunger food drive. In Lancaster, postal workers picked up nonperishable food items left by their customers to be donated to Project HOPE, our local food bank.
    On Friday I dutifully went by the supermarket and purchased about $20 worth of nonperishable items to donate. Around 10 a.m. Saturday, I placed three bags of items at my mailbox.

  • Lancers go 2-2 in region tournament

    The University of South Carolina Lancaster Lancers capped their 2018 baseball season, going 2-2 in the NJCAA Region X baseball tournament in Lexington.
    USCL, which finished 22-23, opened play in the double-elimination field with wins over Spartanburg Methodist and USC Sumter before falling to Florence Darlington Tech and USC Sumter, the eventual Region X tournament champion.
    USCS ended the Lancers’ postseason run with a 17-4 win over USCL on May 7.
    Jackson Barrett and Nick Cicci each had a double and drove in two runs for the Lancers.