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Today's News

  • Cardiac issue may be source of accident

    Christopher Sardelli
    csardelli@thelancasternews.com  
    A Lancaster man was pronounced dead at the scene of a pickup truck accident in the New Cut community Friday morning, Jan. 4.
    Curtis Cauthen, 63, may have died from a heart attack as he was driving the truck at about 9 a.m. Near the intersection of Camp Creek and Old Farm roads, said Lancaster County Deputy Coroner Tony Broome.
    Old Farm Road runs between Shiloh Unity and Camp Creek roads.

  • City Council members take oath

    Jesef Williams
    jwilliams@thelancasternews.com
    Lancaster City Hall was so crowded Thursday night, Jan. 3, that more chairs had to be brought in to council chambers to accommodate the influx of guests.
    There, three council members took the oath of office as they begin their four-year terms following successful campaigns in November’s general election.
    The three are returning Councilwomen Sara Eddins and Tamara Green Garris, and newcomer Jackie Harris.
    Lancaster County Magistrate Fred Thomas administered the oath for each councilwoman.

  • Traffic deaths down in county

    Jesef Williams
    jwilliams@thelancasternews.com
    Lancaster County saw a significant drop in the number of highway fatalities in 2012 compared to the year before.
    Seven people died in vehicle accidents in Lancaster County from Jan. 1 through Dec. 31, according to statistics recently released by the S.C. Highway Patrol.
    In 2011, there were 24 deaths in the county. In 2010, there were 11 deaths. The year before that, there were 18.

  • ECU Pirates Hall of Famer Emory dies

     

       

    Lancaster native Ed Emory, who produced success as a high school and college football coach, died Thursday, Jan. 3 in Greenville, N.C.

  • Flanders posts rare golf feat

     

       

    A regular round of Sunday golf produced some extraordinary play by Lancaster senior golfer George Flanders.

  • Vols lasso Stallions twice

     

       

    BISHOPVILLE – The Andrew Jackson High School basketball teams opened the new year with a solid sweep of non-region foe Lee Central High of Bishopville on Friday, Jan. 4.

  • Don’t let Lancaster County become like Rhode Island

    I’m writing this in response to the recent ordinance passed by the Lancaster County Council on smoking. I attended one of the meetings and I spoke. It turned out to be a waste of time. I could tell their minds were made up. The council was going to follow the status quo of other cities and towns; God forbid if this county stood on its principles.
    I moved here from Rhode Island two years ago. After 50 years, I had to get out of there because that state was overrun by left-leaning activists.

  • I don't have the right pull

    Well, the crisis on the verge of bringing America to its knees has been averted for now.

    No, I’m not talkin’ about the fiscal cliff. I am referring to $8 a gallon milk.

    I heard a recent TV news report that milk is gonna be more expensive than bottled water, so given the television source, it must be so.

    First taxes, now milk.

  • Carolina Christian Academy helps HOPE in Lancaster

    The 16th Annual Christmas canned goods drive for HOPE in Lancaster at Carolina Christian Academy started the last week of November and ended Dec. 19, with the school’s efforts netting 3,545 cans delivered to HOPE that morning.

    With the addition of other items donated besides canned goods, such as boxes of ramen noodles, mashed potatoes, macaroni and cheese, Jell-O and pasta, the total number of items delivered was close to 7,000.

  • Fiscal cliff deal comes with good, bad news

    In what could easily be called good news and bad news for most Americans, U.S. House members voted to approve a bipartisan Senate bill late Tuesday, Jan. 1, that avoids the worst fallout from the so-called “fiscal cliff,” but puts off automatic budget cuts associated with sequestration until March.

    While the bill also does away with Bush-era tax cuts for those making more than $400,000 a year, most working Americans will see an increase in their federal Social Security taxes as well.