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Today's News

  • Building a winner, from the ground up

    Where you start has nothing to do with where you end up. Nobody knows that as well as the Lewisville High Lions boys basketball team.
    We aren’t just talking about the 0-6 start the team endured while playing Class A’s toughest out-of-region schedule. The program itself has come a long way from humble beginnings.
    History recounts that Lewisville’s first teams, in the 1940s, didn’t have a gym to play in. In fact, it didn’t even have a paved surface on which to dribble. The team’s outdoor court was made of dirt.

  • Consumers can squelch credit card swipe fees

    After taxpayers were forced to spend billions bailing out Wall Street a few years ago, it’s easy to understand why consumers have little tolerance for new fees from banks their hard-earned money rescued.
    It certainly helps explain why many states, including South Carolina, have moved to pass laws against businesses charging their customers credit card transaction fees.
    Credit card transaction fees have existed for years. But until recently, MasterCard and Visa did not permit businesses to pass along these fees to consumers.

  • Chocoholic? Just thank a cacao tree

    Following Valentine’s Day and the shelves piled high with those heart-shaped boxes of candy, I have been thinking about the pleasure cacao trees have given the world.

    The fruit of the cacao tree are large football-shaped pods, each containing up to100 seeds. Cacao seeds are the basis of all chocolate. The seeds, or beans, are very bitter, but the pulp that surrounds them is sweet and when it is allowed to ferment, the bitterness of the beans is reduced and they develop a heady chocolaty aroma.

  • Free therapy, no doctor required

    Back in 1999 when Michael Burgess first began working at Hartley Funeral Home, little did he know one day he would end up owning and operating the business.

    With a degree in Sports Administration from Limestone College, he worked in his field of study for about a year before his uncle Jerry Hartley offered him a chance to learn the funeral business. He accepted the job and spent most of his time maintaining the landscaping of the funeral home while learning firsthand about the business.

  • ‘Her little blue eyes danced and danced’

    For Sarah Chilson-Cole, knowing is one thing.

    Just like the rest of her family, this mother of four has come to the sad realization that her niece, 5-year-old Soren Chilson, is tragically gone. She has to come to grips with that. 

  • Peddlers, pawnbrokers and poker machines

    At first glance, peddlers, pawnbrokers and poker machines don’t have much in common, though a recent county decision affects each in a unique way.

    Lancaster County Council voted unanimously on several ordinances during its Feb. 25 meeting to delete any licensing fee requirements for pawnbrokers, video poker machines and peddlers and hawkers from the county’s code.

  • Local United Way names Outlaw as new director

    Though her title is different, Melanie Outlaw says her role will remain the same.

    Outlaw, who’s worked for the United Way of Lancaster County since 2009, has been named the agency’s executive director. Her first official day in that position was March 1.

    Before last week, Outlaw’s title had been resource development coordinator. But because the local United Way office had no executive director, Outlaw assumed those duties as well.

  • Man sentenced for store burglaries

    A Lancaster man arrested last fall for a string of burglaries only three months after his release from prison was sentenced again last month.

    Dennis Michael Robertson, 45, 2720 Lynwood Drive, was sentenced Feb. 21 to 12 years in prison after he pleaded guilty to two counts of violent second-degree burglary, according to a press release from Sixth Circuit Solicitor Doug Barfield.

    He was sentenced by Circuit Court Judge Brooks P. Goldsmith.

  • Federal officials accept S.C. educator evaluation plan

    The U.S. Department of Education has approved the S.C. Department of Education’s proposed guidelines to evaluate educators.

    The performance-based educator-evaluation overhaul is a requirement of the flexibility waiver granted last year by the U.S. Department of Education exempting the  DOE from key provisions of No Child Left Behind.

  • Police report: Woman cuts boyfriend with knife

    A Lancaster man told police that an argument with his girlfriend resulted in her cutting him with a knife last month.

    An officer met with the man at the Municipal Justice Center shortly after 6 p.m. Feb. 11. The man, who lives on West Barr Street, said he was asleep in the bed that morning when he was awakened by his live-in girlfriend, who had her hands around his throat, according to a Lancaster Police Department incident report.

    The man said he jumped up and pushed her off him. They then got into a verbal argument, the report said.