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Today's News

  • Medication poisoning growing problem for seniors

    Every year, the Palmetto Poison Center receives thousands of calls from South Carolinians regarding their medications. Many of these callers are elderly persons who have questions about their prescriptions or recommended dosages. This specific sector of our population is oftentimes prone to uncertainty, which can stem from a number of sources, including loss of memory or confusion resulting from a large volume of prescribed medications.

  • Vote for South Carolina's Outstanding Senior Volunteer

    South Carolina residents are encouraged to cast their vote for the state’s Outstanding Senior Volunteer.

    The recognition is part of the Salute to Senior Service program, sponsored by Home Instead Inc., the franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network. The program honors the contributions of adults 65 and older who give at least 15 hours a month of volunteer service to their favorite causes.

  • Hobbies arthritis sufferers can enjoy

    Individuals with arthritis are often stuck between a rock and a hard place.

    Doctors want people to exercise to keep up the range of motion in affected joints. However, even some limited movements can cause pain and suffering to those with arthritis. Furthermore, individuals with arthritis may shy away from the activities they once enjoyed because the pain is simply too overwhelming.

  • Move it or lose it: five moves to put seniors back in the game

    For Americans 65 and older, falling down can be the worst thing to happen to them, according to statistics:

  • Senior Circle offers wellness and learning opportunities

    Senior Circle is a non-profit resource program offered by Springs Memorial Hospital. The mission of Senior Circle is to encourage a healthy and active lifestyle for seniors by providing programs that encourage continued learning, wellness, health, volunteer opportunities and social activities at our hospital and throughout the community.  We also provide a forum for fellowship and member-only discounts and privileges.  

  • Good communication vital to quality auto repairs

    A poll of ASE-certified automotive technicians indicated that drivers over 60 are among the most conscientious when it comes to taking their vehicles in for routine maintenance and repair.

    The experts at the nonprofit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) remind consumers that good communication between shop and customer can help make the repair process go smoothly.

  • B-3 zoning is on the table again

    Well, it’s about time Lancaster County Council finally took up the controversial issue of B-3 commercial zoning again.
    Since council lifted the Panhandle’s moratorium on B-3 zoning last June (five days before it was set to expire anyway), the issue had been dead in the water, despite several Panhandle residents’ strident calls to bring it back to council’s attention.

  • Living with autism

    Editor’s note: April is Autism Awareness Month. Autism is a brain disorder that often impacts a person’s ability to form relationships with others, communicate and respond appropriately to the external world. Lancaster resident Wanda Sirk shares her experience of what it is like to live with her 24-year-old son, Corey Pope, who is autistic.
    Chances are you know at least one family member who is affected by autism. One in 88 children are diagnosed with autism each year in America and one in 54 of those children are boys.

  • Council approves five new positions at sheriff’s office

    With a push for 24-hour public service at the county’s new sheriff’s office, Lancaster County Council approved five new positions for the facility during its April 22 meeting. 

    County Administrator Steve Willis presented a request from Sheriff Barry Faile to hire four new records clerical positions to assist with 24-hour, 7-day-a-week service at the new sheriff’s office, as well as a new custodial position. 

  • KVLT lecture highlights threatened Catawba village sites

    University of North Carolina archeologist Dr. Stephen Davis pointed to a screen showing a satellite image of a housing development under construction in the Nation Ford area of Fort Mill.

    At the center, superimposed on a grid of curving gray roads and the empty dirt lots of a budding golf community, is a red circle marking the location of a nearly 300-year-old Catawba Indian settlement.