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Today's News

  • IL's so close ... so far away

     

       

    GILBERT – Bishop England High School freshman Joel Bunting’s golden goal was just that.

  • Fleeing robbery suspect runs out of gas

    A man accused of snatching money from the cash register at a community store Monday, May 20, wasn’t on the lam long before a series of bumbling mistakes led to his capture by a swarm of sheriff’s deputies and a K-9.

    James Marvin McDonald, 35, of Concord, N.C., is charged with strong arm robbery of Camp Creek Grocery, 2366 Camp Creek Road.

    “We got ‘em,” said Lancaster County Sheriff Barry Faile minutes after McDonald was in custody.

  • Stellar seasons for USCL teams

    The 2013 University of South Carolina Lancaster spring semester might be history, but a pair of  USCL spring sports teams are still going strong.
    The Lancers’ golf team and baseball squad have extended their seasons into post-season play.
    The 25-12 USCL golf team, under the leadership of coach Ricky Walters, is headed to the National Junior College national tournament after winning the Region X tournament with a sudden death win over Wake Tech at the Boscobel Golf Course in Pendleton last month.

  • Are we prepared for terrorist event?

    Like their fellow Americans across the country, South Carolinians were horrified at the recent Boston Marathon bombings, which killed three people and injured dozens of others.
    Here at home, our heartfelt prayers went out to the victims and their families as a difficult question hangs over our state. It’s a question none of us wants to imagine, but we must: What if it happened here?

  • Bill: Business as usual or is it real reform?

    Several weeks ago we joined with other South Carolina groups to expose an effort by House leaders to sabotage ethics reform and evade disclosure and independent scrutiny.
    House leaders’ plan to decriminalize ethics violations and force citizen activists to become lobbyists was outrageous, and a diverse coalition of citizen groups jointly and publicly denounced it.

  • S.C. and digital learning: The good, bad and ugly

    Anyone who has followed our columns knows that I am a huge believer in the power of technology to transform education and enable “leapfrog” progress for our children.
    And unless you have been living under a rock, don’t read newspapers, watch TV or think about what’s happening in the world, one thing is abundantly clear to all – technology is as vital to education in the 21st century as books and chalk boards were in the 19th and 20th centuries.

  • Cocky’s book mission – improve literacy

    By Chloe Gould
    USC School of Journalism
    Rows of first-graders sat cross-legged in their elementary school’s library, chattering to kids in other classes in fits of nervous excitement.
    They pulled on the laces in their sneakers and were reminded, time and time again, to keep their bottoms on the ground.
    “If I see Cocky, I’m going to pee my pants,” said one student at W.B. Goodwin Elementary School in North Charleston.

  • Summer classes underway at USC

    University of South Carolina
    The University of South Carolina’s expansion to three full semesters is underway, with classes beginning this week.
    Officials say student response, particularly among juniors, has been strong to On Your Time: Summer at Carolina, a new program of summer courses offered over eight sessions that range from one to 12 weeks. Because of its flexible design, course registration for the later summer sessions is still open, allowing students to progress toward their degree and working toward the goal of graduating in four years.

  • Protecting our local watersheds

    As a part of Lancaster County for more than 60 years, the Lancaster Soil and Water Conservation District wants to remind the community that everyone has a connection to natural resources. The National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD) celebrated the 58th year of Stewardship Week April 28-May 5. The 2013 Stewardship Week was themed “Where Does Your Water Shed?”  

  • Tree tunnels can take your breath away

    I have always loved the way old trees, especially Live Oaks, arch over roads and lawns.

    Every time I drive toward Edisto Island, the loveliness of moss-draped limbs hanging overhead gives me goosebumps.

    Years ago it was such a thrill to walk under the magnificent trees in front of Oak Alley Plantation near New Orleans, that iconic scene that I had looked at wistfully in magazines for years.

    Both of these places are examples of tree tunnels, roads or paths with trees on both sides forming a canopy overhead.