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Today's News

  • Police investigate armed robbery at Pelican Prints

    Police continue to investigate an armed robbery that occurred at a Lancaster business last week.

    An officer came to Pelican Prints, 1106 W. Meeting St., just before 2:30 p.m. Dec. 21, to speak with a man inside the business.

    The man said that he and a woman were inside when two armed men entered the building, according to a Lancaster Police Department incident report.

    The man said the assailants ordered he and the woman, at gunpoint, to lie on the floor and hand over all of their money.

  • Fort Lawn fire station to get much-needed repairs

    FORT LAWN – The Fort Lawn Fire Department has a decrepit ceiling at its fire station that is threatening three fire apparatus housed inside but county officials have initiated the process to make the long-needed improvements, said Chester County Supervisor Carlisle Roddey.

  • FOIA change may be in the works

    A bill recently pre-filed in the S.C. House of Representatives would amend the state’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to make government much more transparent and responsive.

     This is the second attempt by Rep. Bill Taylor (R-Aiken) to reform the FOIA. 

    Last spring his similar bill won approval in the House by a 101-1 vote, but stalled in the State Senate in the final days of the legislative session.

  • Lady Jackets rip Devils in tournament opener

     

       

    The Buford High School Lady Jackets were impressive in launching defense of their title in the annual Comporium Christmas Classic at Andrew Jackson High School on Thursday, Dec. 28.

  • Bruin wrestlers look to improve

     Lancaster High second-year wrestling coach Leon Boulware has been pleased with the work of the LHS grapplers for the better part of the 2012 season, but not their latest mat outing.

  • After the holidays, let your Christmas tree be a benefit for the state’s fish, widlife

    Instead of letting your Christmas tree take up space in a landfill this year, state natural resources officials suggest giving it a second life by putting it to good use for fish or wildlife.

     In the state’s rural areas, discarded Christmas trees can be put to good use as erosion control or as brush piles to provide resting and escape cover for small animals.

    In addition to benefiting small game such as quail and rabbits, brush piles constructed of Christmas trees can help birds such as sparrows, towhees and wrens.

  • Bruins down Bulldogs

    WINNSBORO – The Lancaster Bruins opened play in the first Breast Cancer Awareness basketball tournament with a win over Class AAA Camden on Wednesday, Dec. 26.

    LHS, 7-5, used a strong start to open the second half to gain the 48-37 win over the Bulldogs in the afternoon session at Fairfield Central High School in Winnsboro.

  • Investigators on scene of deadly fire in Kershaw

    KERSHAW – Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office investigators are on the scene of a deadly fire in Kershaw today, the second in Lancaster County since Friday.

    According to Lancaster County officials, firefighters from the Kershaw, Heath Springs, Black Creek and Rich Hill volunteer fire departments were dispatched to a home on Marion Street around 10:30 a.m. Where they later discovered a body inside the home.

    The identity of the deceased has yet to be identified.

  • SMS deserves School to Watch honor

    A toast to South Middle School’s recent success is in order. The toast would likely go something like this, “Here’s looking at you, SMS.”
    South has earned the coveted honor of a School to Watch.
    The honor puts SMS in elite company as less than 350 schools nationwide have earned the honor, and only 13 in the Palmetto State.
    One of those lucky 13 is Indian Land Middle School in the county’s Panhandle, which was recently redesignated a School to Watch after garnering the title in 2010.

  • Medal of Valor honors S.C. law enforcement’s bravest

    It’s something folks might often take for granted, and understandably so.
    After all, we live in a modern society and pay our taxes, and therefore we fully expect the traffic lights to work and the firetrucks to respond when we need them to.
    But how often do we really stop and think of the sometimes life-threatening circumstances behind those expectations when it comes to our law enforcement officers?
    Fortunately, there’s an organization that helps us do just that – the S.C. Law Enforcement Officers Association.