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Today's News

  • Bolt boosts IL to playoff win

    CAMDEN – Indian Land Bolted into the winner’s bracket of the Class AAA Upper State championship baseball playoffs Thursday in Camden.

    The 21-7 Warriors, bolstered by ace senior pitcher Nolan Bolt, opened the Class AA Upstate title tournament with a 4-1 win over Camden High School.

    Camden, the Region IV-AAA runner-up to Indian Land during regular-season play, didn’t have an answer for Bolt on the mound, or at the plate.

  • Fighting opioid scourge with information

    Lancaster County’s opioid crisis is not only bad – it’s getting worse.
    “It’s sad, and it’s frustrating, because it’s only gaining momentum,” Lancaster County Coroner Karla Deese said.
    “In 2016, we had five opioid deaths and none of them contained illicit fentanyl,” Deese said. “By the time we closed out 2017, we had 25 deaths, and 18 of those contained fentanyl. So we had a 400 percent increase in opioid deaths in just one year.”

  • 5 charged in drug-trafficking busts

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office arrested five Lancaster residents Thursday and Friday on multiple drug-trafficking charges.
    Christopher Michael Rollings, 36, his wife Natasha Jean Rollings, 33, and William James Gainey Jr., 55, all of 2120 Barnett St., were arrested Thursday morning.
    Marqwevius Devonte Seegars, 26, and Tangie Phatrice Craig, 30, both of 254 South Avenue, were arrested early Friday.

  • Businessman charged in sex case involving 2 young teens

    Lancaster business owner and former civic leader Chris Tillman has been arrested again, this time on sex-offense charges involving two young girls, both under age 15.
    According to an arrest warrant, one of the girls told the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office in March that there had been repeated incidences over a two-year period in which Tillman sexually gratified himself by using her feet.
    The girl said this happened during teen sleepovers at Tillman’s house. She said he would find her when the lights went out or everyone else was asleep.

  • Picking site for new animal shelter

    County officials are moving ahead to build a new animal shelter at a cost of $1.25 million to $1.75 million, and they will select the site this month.
    The list of possible locations has been trimmed to two. The preferred site is near the public works complex on Pageland Highway.  
    The other option is on the southern side of S.C. 9 Bypass West between West Meeting Street and Grace Avenue near the air rail park.

  • Tell me your best memory of our town

    Downtown Lancaster is teeming with memories for those in the 40-plus age bracket.
    There’s cruising Main Street after dark to look at the reflection of your shiny car in storefront glass.
    Dropping a penny in the sidewalk scales at City Drug to check your weight after scarfing down a double handful of fresh-baked raspberry-topped tea cookies that Mr. Courtney had just put in the display case at Lancaster Bakery.

  • L&C says Kershaw can’t mow along track

    KERSHAW – Amid a dispute over underground utility lines, the L&C Railway has discontinued the town of Kershaw’s longtime practice of mowing the six-block Cleveland Street greenway that runs beside the railroad’s tracks.
    Kershaw officials received a certified letter dated April 18 from Railway Auditing & Management Services (RAMS) of Jacksonville, Fla., telling them to “cease immediately” all landscaping services provided by the town on Lancaster & Chester Railroad property.

  • ‘Fall in’

    Brian Garner
    Landmark News Service

    You can image the pastor of the precursor to Union ARP Church in Richburg standing on the church steps, issuing a call to his neighbors.
    “All able-bodied souls who desire to defend these colonies and in especial the Colony of South Carolina, and who are enlisted in the militia are requested and required to report for Muster at the Meeting House,” he might have said.

  • Column: The inherent risk of specialization in school sports

    One of the responsibilities that parents take most seriously is protecting their children from injury, whether it is buckling seat belts or strapping on a bike helmet.
     And when their kids become teenagers and want to participate in sports or other activities, parents do everything they can to keep their sons and daughters from getting hurt.

  • Column: Panhandle town proponents, just leave the rest of us alone

    Were you surprised with the outcome of the March 27 vote on Indian Land becoming a town – 1,853 yes votes and 9,086 no?
    Many of us who voted against incorporation could not believe over 1,800 voted for the proposed town.
    Why were many of us opposed? Well, it was more dealing with the unknown rather than knowing what to expect if it should pass.
    The big unknown was what the yearly tax bill would be. Those living in subdivisions such as Sun City did not wish to have another bill each year in the form of a city tax.