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Local News

  • Substitute teacher charged with asking 16-year-old for sex

    A Lancaster County School District substitute teacher was arrested Thursday after being accused of asking a 16-year-old student for sex, according to a Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office release.
    Jachreo Dmitri Hinson, 24, of Lancaster, was charged with criminal solicitation of a minor, a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison. 
    According to the release, Hinson was substituting at Lancaster High School and began communicating with a 16-year-old girl in one of his classes.

  • Tropical-storm warning issued for county

    The National Weather Service has issued a tropical-storm warning for Lancaster County, with 10-plus inches of rain expected here as Hurricane Florence moves inland over the next several days.
    A tropical-storm warning means that winds of 36 to 73 mph are possible. The weather service has also issued a flash-flood watch for the county.

  • State issues burning ban

    The S.C. Forestry Commission has issued a statewide burning ban until futher notice.
    The ban prohibits all outdoor burning, including yard debris burning, campfires and burning for forestry, wildlife or agricultural purposes in all unincorporated areas.
    While open-fire cooking isn’t part of the ban, the forestry commission is advising all citizens to be vigilant until the notification gets lifted.

  • LPR modifies evening schedule for Thusday, Friday

    The Lancaster County Parks and Recreation has cancelled all evening indoor and outdoor activities from Thursday through Sunday ahead of Hurricane Florence.
    The after school program will run Thursday as scheduled, but will be suspended Friday since schools classes have been cancelled for the day. For details, call (803) 285-5545.
     

  • Florence shifts toward South Carolina (5 p.m. update)

    Hurricane Florence has no intention of giving Lancaster County the brushoff.
    An 11 a.m. Wednesday update on the storm from the National Weather Service shows that northern South Carolina will get hit harder than initially thought after two radical overnight shifts in direction.
    The massive storm is now expected to travel more westward after colliding with a high-pressure system developing over the northeast United States.  
    The storm is now projected to pass through the heart of South Carolina on midday Sunday after weakening into a tropical depression.

  • Schools to close Friday

    The Lancaster County School District just announced that all Friday classes are cancelled. After-school programs will still be held Thursday, but there will no extracurricular activities after 6 p.m. Thursday or on Friday.

    “Right now, our area isn’t expected to get any major effects of Hurricane Florence until Friday,” said school school superintendent Dr. Jonathan Phipps. “Of course, we’ll continue to monitor the storm forecasts and adjust as necessary.”


     

  • Distribution, manufacturing fuel Fort Lawn resurgence

    Brian Garner

    Landmark News Service

    A quiet revitalization is going on at the four former Springs Industries plants in Fort Lawn, led by Springs Creative CEO Derick Close.

    Close bought the Fort Lawn plants that his family used to own – Elliott, Frances, Leroy and Riverlawn – and has made them the components of Springsteen Logistics, a division of his Springs Creative Group.

  • McMaster orders coastal evacuation

    COLUMBIA – Gov. Henry McMaster has ordered the mandatory evacuation of an estimated 1 million people in eight coastal S.C. counties beginning at noon Tuesday as Hurricane Florence bears down on the Carolinas.
    “We do not want to risk one South Carolina life in this hurricane, so we’re willing to suffer some inconvenience…. This is a very dangerous hurricane,” McMaster said at a Monday afternoon briefing.    

  • McMaster holds 2:30 p.m. brief on Hurricane Florence

    COLUMBIA – South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster will hold a media briefing at 2:30 p.m. today to update the public on Hurricane Florence’s potential impact on the state.
    Local officials are also meeting at 3 p.m. today at the Emergency Operations Center on White Street to discuss the storm, which intensified to Category 4, with winds in excess of 130 mph as it continues to bear down on the Carolina coast.

  • Governor declares state of emergency as storm path aims at Carolinas

    COLUMBIA – South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster declared a state of emergency Saturday afternoon with the looming possibility that a hurricane could make landfall somewhere in the Carolinas next week.
    “This storm is too powerful and its path is too uncertain to take any chances,” McMaster said of Tropical Storm Florence. Spinning out in the Atlantic Ocean, the storm is expected to be approaching hurricane strength again late Saturday.