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Local

  • Sewer grant paves the way for Kershaw business park

    KERSHAW – The town has received a $326,115 grant from the S.C. Rural Infrastructure Authority to pay two-thirds of the costs for much-needed upgrades at its wastewater treatment plant.
    “When it’s all said and done, we’ll be upgraded to where we need to be,” said Kershaw Mayor Mark Dorman. “It needed to be done some time ago, but thankfully, we’re going to be doing this pretty soon.”  
    The total estimated cost is $489,950, with the town providing a one-third match of almost $164,000.

  • Promise Neighborhood tackles 15 homes on Clinton Avenue

    Mary Esther Culvert swept her front porch last Wednesday after volunteers had finished stripping her house to prep it for painting.
    A beaming smile spread across her face as she described the color she picked for the exterior of her home.
    “I’m so overwhelmed with happiness and gratefulness,” said Culvert.
    The Clinton Avenue resident was selected to have her home repaired and updated as part of Lancaster’s Promise Neighborhood project, which aims to improve the lives of residents in the Clinton Elementary attendance zone.

  • IL school sidewalk project is back on

    A derailed plan to build a sidewalk on the northwest side of River Road to improve student safety near Indian Land Middle and High schools may be back on track.
    The Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study committee (RFATS) tentatively agreed to pick up most of the cost at its May 18 meeting.
    “This is a great example of teamwork,” said Lancaster County Council member Brian Carnes, who currently chairs RFATS.

  • Pausing to honor the fallen

    About 100 people assembled in the shade Sunday afternoon at Lancaster Memorial Park – some in military uniforms, others wearing red, white and blue – to honor those who have served and sacrificed for their country.
    The city’s Memorial Day program included the Gold Star Mothers recognition of Nancy Walters and Doris Wilson, who both lost sons in Vietnam, and a memorial remembrance of local veterans who died within the last year.
    Another large gathering took place at the Buford Battleground site on Saturday.   

  • Mom questioned after dead infant found

    Deputies from the Chesterfield County Sheriff’s Office discovered the dead body of a 1-year-old child hidden in a diaper box about 1,000 feet from a home off Jackson Road East outside of Chesterfield on Tuesday afternoon.
    Sheriff Jay Brooks said the mother was taken into custody as a suspect in the child’s death, and she was being questioned at 5 p.m. Tuesday. The woman’s name was not immediately released, and she had not been charged as of press time.

  • Time to vaccinate horses

    From release 

    COLUMBIA — A five-milligram mosquito can slay a 1,000-pound horse in a matter of days. All it needs is the right virus.

    The horse can survive the attack. All it needs is the right vaccine at the right time.

    Now is the right time.

    “Last year in South Carolina, we had 10 cases of West Nile Virus in horses and another nine of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE),” said Sean Eastman, director of field services for the Animal Health Programs branch of Clemson University Livestock-Poultry Health.

  • Pageland updates street closing list

    The Pageland Town Council changed the streets it will close for special events during a special town council meeting May 21. 

    Streets that will be closed for events such as the monthly Cruise In and the Parade of Power are the 100 block of Pearl street and the 100 block of east and west Maynor street.

  • Weed worse than kudzu? If you see it, call experts

    Tom Hallman
    Clemson University

    CLEMSON – Just as the weather warms, they pop their ugly heads out of hiding. But thank goodness they do, because now is the best time to find them so they can be destroyed.
    The flowers of cogongrass are in bloom now, helping the invasive weed resume its aggressive spread to new fields and forests. Left unchecked, cogongrass will form dense stands over large areas and choke out native plants, doing untold damage to local ecology and to farmers’ fields.

  • For Regina Belle, Lancaster is like family

    Regina Belle was disappointed when she missed her concert at USC Lancaster in February after coming down with the flu.
    Now, with the award-winning R&B vocalist taking to the Bundy Auditorium stage Thursday to make up for it, she has two words for fans – “Get ready.”

  • Norrell’s greatest skill: Connecting

    Retired couple Carol Edens and Ed Epps chatted with Democratic gubernatorial candidate James Smith for a few minutes Wednesday at an Irish pub in Spartanburg.
    Then Edens asked about “that 15-year-old girl” who was campaigning with him for lieutenant governor.
    “Oh, she’s young,” Smith said. “But she’s a good egg, with an old soul.”
    Smith moved on, and Mandy Powers Norrell sat down at their table with a bright, wide smile, locking eyes individually with the man and then the woman.