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Local

  • Traveler with disabled car, dead phone finds kind folks a-plenty

    Linda H. Thompson seriously needed a Good Samaritan on the Friday of Memorial Day weekend.
    She was traveling through Lancaster when her car broke down on South Main Street, more than an hour away from her Charlotte home. To make matters worse, her cell phone ran out of power about the same time.
    A few minutes shy of 5 p.m., the 73-year-old pulled her overheating car into a parking spot at the coroner’s office.
    “I was in quite a pickle,” Thompson recalled this week. “I knew I was in pretty bad shape.”

  • County picks site for new animal shelter

    The new animal shelter will be built on county-owned property off Pageland Highway between Lancaster Convalescent Center and Sunshine Road.
    “It’s a good site that has very level terrain in the area we’re looking to place the shelter,” said Keck & Wood civil engineer John Gast, who recommended the site during a presentation Tuesday at the Lancaster County Council meeting.
    Council approved the site on a 5-0 vote, with council members Brian Carnes and Jack Estridge absent.

  • Duke pushing floodwaters down the Catawba chain
  • Big snag for Tunnell suit against county

    Keith Tunnell’s defamation lawsuit against the county and Lancaster County Council members Larry Honeycutt, Charlene McGriff and former councilman Bob Bundy is a big step closer to being dismissed.
    Circuit Judge Brian Gibbons ruled verbally from the bench April 30 that he intends to grant a summary judgment in favor of the defendants, meaning the case would not be allowed to go to trial.

  • Eclectic weekend features farmers, artists, fun-seekers

    Cherry Doster
    See Lancaster SC

    Agriculture is a vital part of our state’s economy, and the industry impacts every citizen, generating billions of dollars in economic activity and creating thousands of jobs.
    It’s important for communities to support S.C. farmers and producers by buying local. It keeps our dollars here and generates an even greater impact on the rural economy and job growth.

  • Officials await 11-month-old girl’s autopsy

    Chesterfield County sheriff’s deputies are again searching a house off Jackson Road outside Chesterfield, seeking clues in the death of an 11-month-old girl.
    Breanna Denise Lewis, 19, the child’s mother, is currently being held at the Chesterfield County Detention Center, charged with filing a false police report, desecration or removal of human remains, and tampering with physical evidence. Bond for the three charges is $71,000.
    Breanna Lewis was arrested after her story of someone kidnapping her child, Harlee Lane Lewis, started to unravel on Tuesday.

  • Norman talks about Parnell, the economy, Russia probe

    Rep. Ralph Norman on Wednesday discussed the revelations that his Democratic congressional opponent Archie Parnell physically abused his first wife in 1973.
    “It’s sad. I feel for his family and for his ex-wife,” Norman said during a meeting with Lancaster News staffers.
    “But at the same time, you disclose something like that,” he said. “In politics, your life is an open book…. You disclose that.

  • County government annex to open in IL

    Conducting business with the county is set to get a bit easier for Indian Land residents.
    The long-awaited Indian Land Service Center – a satellite office for numerous Lancaster County government functions – is set to open for business June 19, said County Administrator Steve Willis. A ribbon-cutting is slated for June 15.

  • Wayward cockatiel Hawkeye back home

    To fourth-grade teacher Amy Cogan, the big bird dive-bombing her students outside Harrisburg Elementary School two weeks ago had a familiar shape.
    It was a cockatiel, and it landed atop a soccer goal.
    “The bird was flying low and swooping down at the kids,” Cogan said. “It obviously wasn’t a wild bird. I got closer and put my hand on the net, and it leapt onto my hand.
    “I started talking to it, and it crawled up my arm. It was a pretty neat experience.”

  • County revenues back on track

    Coding errors on tax bills that led to a shortfall in county property-tax collections earlier this year have been fixed, and collections are now back in line, County Administrator Steve Willis told Lancaster County Council members Tuesday night.
    “At this point, based on information that we have – and I don’t presume to speak for the auditor’s office – we have not missed anyone,” Willis said. “There were delays and some coding errors…. That has been corrected.”