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Local

  • State switching to paper-based ballots

    Beginning Jan. 1, the state will switch to a paper-based ballot system that provides a paper trail for all elections.
    Officials announced Monday that Election Systems and Software (ES&S) Express Vote of Nebraska has been awarded a $51 million contract to provide the state with a more secure voting system.
    It will replace the paperless system that’s been in place in the state since 2004.

  • Too much water

    Nearly a foot of weekend rain along the northern Catawba River basin has washed down into areas of Lancaster County this week, flooding some neighborhoods and closing a section of Van Wyck Road near Steel Hill for most of the day Monday.
    Rick Jiran, Duke Energy spokesman, said early Tuesday that inflow from the river basin has caused Lake Wateree to spill over, and it is expected to exceed 103.5 feet with more rain anticipated. The lake level will be difficult to forecast until the rain has stopped and the river flows have stopped rising, he said.

  • With 3 sons to lead, mom goes back to get diploma

    Ten years after she had planned to graduate from high school, Lancaster resident Jasmine Johnson has finally received her Lancaster High School diploma.
    Instead of walking across the stage with her fellow Lancaster Adult Education grads, Johnson joined her son, Zi’Onn, who was graduating from 4K at Clinton Elementary School the same day.
    “I was very happy,” Johnson said this week. “That was the happiest day of my life.”

  • BES student passionate about pets

    A local animal-advocacy group has gotten some much-needed pet supplies because a second grader read a library book.
    The book, “Strays Like Us” by Cecilia Galante, convinced Buford Elementary School’s Ally Brasington to lead a recent school-wide pet supply donation drive for Lancaster’s SPCA chapter.
    “Pets should be taken better care of than they are, and if you watch their expressions, they’ll tell you exactly what they need,” said Ally, a rising third grader.

  • Hwy 55’s cruise-ins show off cool rides

    For the past year, a group of classic-car buffs has been swapping stories and tips once a month in the Hwy 55 parking lot on Lancaster’s bypass.
    These Classic Car Cruise-ins are from 5:30-7:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month. Anyone can bring an old car out to show off during the events.
    One of the group’s founders, Ron Faile, said the original idea was to revive the old Memory Lane Cruisers group, but now they see anywhere from five to 20 classic cars set up outside the restaurant.

  • Standing up to bullying

    When Tina Watts’ autistic grandson came home from the third grade and told her he had been bullied at school, she decided to take action.
    She reached out via Facebook to create an anti-bullying campaign and was shocked by the response.
    “I had a lot of young ladies tell me their stories,” Watts said. “It’s shocking how many people get bullied. It’s worse than what I thought it would be.”

  • Kershaw trims budget, increases fees

    KERSHAW – Town leaders vowed to cut spending in the fiscal 2019-20 budget and are delivering on that promise.
    The proposed budget, unanimously passed on first reading Monday night, is set at $3.8 million, down from this year’s $3.9 million. One more reading is required.
    On paper, that’s a 2.6 percent decrease, but Mayor Mark Dorman said spending will actually be cut about 3.75 percent.

  • Kershaw trims budget, increases fees

    KERSHAW – Town leaders vowed to cut spending in the fiscal 2019-20 budget and are delivering on that promise.
    The proposed budget, unanimously passed on first reading Monday night, is set at $3.8 million, down from this year’s $3.9 million. One more reading is required.
    On paper, that’s a 2.6 percent decrease, but Mayor Mark Dorman said spending will actually be cut about 3.75 percent.

  • Kershaw trims budget, increases fees

    KERSHAW – Town leaders vowed to cut spending in the fiscal 2019-20 budget and are delivering on that promise.
    The proposed budget, unanimously passed on first reading Monday night, is set at $3.8 million, down from this year’s $3.9 million. One more reading is required.
    On paper, that’s a 2.6 percent decrease, but Mayor Mark Dorman said spending will actually be cut about 3.75 percent.

  • Kershaw trims budget, increases fees

    KERSHAW – Town leaders vowed to cut spending in the fiscal 2019-20 budget and are delivering on that promise.
    The proposed budget, unanimously passed on first reading Monday night, is set at $3.8 million, down from this year’s $3.9 million. One more reading is required.
    On paper, that’s a 2.6 percent decrease, but Mayor Mark Dorman said spending will actually be cut about 3.75 percent.