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Local

  • Norrell: Schools bill ‘wonderful, revolutionary’

    Rep. Mandy Powers Norrell says the proposed legislation to overhaul the state’s public education system addresses teacher recruitment and retention “in a huge way.”
    “It has massive incentives,” Norrell told members of the local Democratic Party last Thursday night during its monthly meeting at the Lancaster County Library.
    “It increases salaries far beyond the Southeastern average,” she said, noting that it hikes teacher pay by a total of about 10 percent over the next two years ($270 million).

  • Great Falls man dies in S.C. 9 wreck

    A Great Falls man died Monday morning in a one-vehicle wreck on S.C. 9 near Grace Avenue west of Lancaster.
    The victim was David Wayne Roberts, 63, according to the Lancaster County Coroner’s Office. He was pronounced dead at the scene.
    According to Lance Cpl. Gary Miller of the S.C. Highway Patrol, Roberts was alone driving west on S.C. 9 shortly before 7:15 a.m. His 2003 Chevy Trailblazer left the right side of the road and hit a guardrail before swerving to the left down an embankment in the median and smashing into a tree.

  • IL church gives $50K to women’s center

    Transformation Church showed its support for the Women’s Enrichment Center in Lancaster this week with a sizable donation, which will have a considerable impact on the nonprofit’s local operations.
    The Indian Land church donated $50,000 to the pregnancy center, about half of what the nonprofit usually collects in annual donations.

  • Phoenix Café debuts

    The culinary arts kitchen at the Lancaster County Career Center was abuzz late Friday morning, and will continue to stay busy every other Friday with the grand opening of The Phoenix Café.
    The café, named after the new school mascot, features made-from-scratch meals prepared in-house by students, and serves the staff at Lancaster High School, the school district HQ and the career center.
    Chef Scott Michaw is at the helm in the kitchen, with more than 10 years of experience as a professional chef, and he said his students love this opportunity to cook.

  • Evolution of an artist

    Ashley Lowrimore
    For The Lancaster News

    Kicking off a year-long gallery exhibition tracing the evolution of her work, traditional artist Beckee Garris will be honored at a reception from 1-3 p.m. Friday at USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center.
    A citizen of the Catawba Indian Nation, Garris appeared as artist-in-residence at the NASC last fall, demonstrating pottery- and basket-making techniques and sharing Catawba oral histories and traditions.

  • Honeycutt: Is Thread Trail best use of scarce funds?

    The county’s Unified Development Ordinance, passed in 2016, requires subdivision builders along the path of the massive Carolina Thread Trail to construct sections of the trail.
    Larry Honeycutt wants to tap the brakes on that idea.
    It’s not that he opposes the trail, the four-term county council member says. He just thinks the county needs to weigh all the other growth-propelled needs it could satisfy with that money from developers – things like fire stations, EMS equipment and library space.

  • Main library’s new look: Sleek, modern

    Nearly five years after voters approved updating Lancaster County’s three libraries, architects are showing us how two of the projects will look.
    McMillan Pazdan Smith this week unveiled its sleek, modern design for the expansion and refurbishment of the main Lancaster County Library, and an addition to Del Webb Library in Indian Land that blends into the existing structure.

  • Gunshot just misses cops in drug raid

    A Lancaster man and woman were arrested Friday after a shot was fired at SWAT team members entering their home during a drug raid, according to the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office.

  • After 3 years, Jaxon beats leukemia

    Jaxon Ingram was glowing Friday as his dad, Jason, lifted him up to clang the victory bell.
    About 20 friends and relatives lined a hallway at Charlotte’s Levine Children’s Hospital – cheering, clapping, some of them crying. He had endured dozens of cancer treatments there for three years.
    The 9-year-old’s T-shirt said it all: “The battle is over #winner.”
    “After monthly treatments at the hospital and taking pills every night, this is such a relief,” said his mom, Amy Ingram.

  • Research links past lynchings to today’s low voter turnout

    Rick Uhlmann
    Clemson University

    CLEMSON – Atrocities committed against black Americans generations ago are having an impact today on their descendants’ decision to cast ballots in elections, according to research conducted by a Clemson University economic historian.