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Local

  • Norman: Job incentives in new law great for Lancaster

    Rep. Ralph Norman talked up job growth Wednesday in downtown Lancaster, home to two of South Carolina’s chosen “opportunity zones,” designed to draw private investment to economically distressed parts of the country.
    Ten census tracts across Norman’s 5th Congressional District are among the targets of the new federal program. 

  • Long road to reopen AJMS gets a bit longer

    Andrew Jackson Middle School’s opening has been pushed back another week to April 24 because of scheduling for the final inspection of the extensive fire repairs.
    “I want to say again to parents, students, teachers and staff at Andrew Jackson Middle and at our host schools how much we appreciate all the support and hard work you’ve put into making this tough situation work,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps.

  • Mayor Howard dies at 67

    Three months after being diagnosed with lung cancer, Lancaster Mayor John Howard died Tuesday night at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. He was 67.

    “He fought so hard and would have wanted nothing more than to have had more time with his family, friends and beloved city of Lancaster,” daughter Shelley Howard-Robinson said. “Unfortunately, his lungs and body were just too weak, though his spirit was so strong until the end.”

  • John Howard: Quote machine

    Reporters call a politician like John Howard a “quote machine.”
    There was almost never a question he wouldn’t answer, often with a home-spun quip or outlandish analogy. He was passionate – often fiery, sometimes indignant – about how the city conducted business.
    Howard gravitated to olfactory references.
    “This thing is starting to resemble a slop jar,” he once fumed over some governmental calamity. “The more you stir it up, the worse it stinks.”

  • Special mayoral election set for July 10

     

    As Lancaster mourns John Howard’s passing, city officials have to put in motion the process for filling the mayoral seat he left behind.

    The seat is up for re-election Nov. 6, but City Administrator Flip Hutfles says the city cannot wait until that election.

  • Lancaster Mayor John Howard dies

    Four months after being diagnosed with lung cancer, Lancaster Mayor John Howard died Tuesday night at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. He was 67.

  • Lancaster man charged in Jack’s robbery

    A Lancaster man faces multiple charges in the armed robbery of a convenience store last month.
    Tyrone Derell Mingo, 30, of Mint Street, was arrested March 23 at a Rock Street home, according to a Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office release.  
    Mingo is charged with armed robbery, kidnapping and possession of a firearm during the commission of a violent crime in the March 16 armed robbery of Jack’s Highway 9 Party Shop, 2190 Pageland Highway.

  • Clemson Men of Color Summit aims to bridge achievement gap

    Wanda Johnson
    Clemson University

    CLEMSON – An impressive lineup of nationally and internationally known speakers will share their knowledge and experience with thousands of young boys and men during Clemson University’s 2018 Men of Color National Summit.
    The summit returns to the TD Convention Center in Greenville on April 12-13, with more than 45 sessions designed to encourage students to evaluate themselves and discover their full potential.

  • ‘Total and complete shock’

    Wayne Murray was 16 years old on this day 50 years ago, standing inside a grocery store in Pasadena, Calif., when the news came over the radio.
    “Dr. Martin Luther King has been assassinated,” it said. All the shoppers in the store just froze in place and listened.
    “I was in total and complete shock,” the Rev. Murray recalled Monday.
    He left the store and went home to find his mother watching the news on TV.

  • Easter fun at Palmetto Place

    Former residents of Palmetto Place Apartments returned last Sunday to treat a new generation to an Easter egg hunt, games, snow cones and hot dogs.
    Nearly 200 kids scoured the field for eggs between the apartment complex and the picnic shelter Sunday afternoon.
    Some wearing brand new Easter outfits and others in more casual wear squatted and tiptoed to gather eggs hidden in crevices and on top of playground equipment. Older children held the hands of younger children, helping them navigate the new experience.