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Local

  • Wylie Street pool opens on May 26

    From release

    The Lancaster County Parks and Recreation’s Wylie Street Swimming Pool, 106 South Wylie St., will open May 26 for the 2018 season.

    Pool hours are 3-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-5 p.m. Saturday, and 1:30-4:30 p.m. on Sunday.

    The swimming fees are a single-day fee of $3 per person (all ages), single-month pass, $20 per person (all ages), single-season pass, $50 per person (all ages), family month pass, $50 (no more than a family of five) and a family season pass, $100, (no more than a family of five).

  • Tax deadline coming soon

    If you haven’t filed your taxes yet, now is the time to do so.
    They must be filed by midnight April 17. This is the absolute, drop-dead deadline when the IRS will quit accepting filings electronically. If you file by mail, as long as your return is postmarked before the deadline, it will be accepted.
    The date is traditionally April 15, but when it falls on a weekend it is pushed to the following Monday. This year it was pushed to Tuesday, April 17, because Washington, D.C., is celebrating its emancipation holiday on Monday.

  • Mayor Howard’s funeral today

    A service celebrating the late Lancaster Mayor John Howard’s life is 2 p.m. today, April 15, at Second Baptist Church, 1426 Great Falls Highway.
    The family will receive visitors after the service and at other times at his daughter’s home in Fort Mill.
    In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you consider donating to the Lancaster Promise Neighborhood through the Lancaster County Partners for Youth or the Lancaster County Council of the Arts.
    An online guest register is available on the obituaries page at www.burgessfunerals.com.

  • IL looks to move on, unify after vote

    It’s been 20 days since Indian Land voters chose overwhelmingly not to incorporate.
    So, now what?
    For one thing, do not expect another incorporation organizing effort any time soon, said John A. Delfausse, vice president and treasurer of pro-incorporation Voters for a Town of Indian Land.
    Years down the line perhaps those who opposed incorporation will eventually seek it, he said.
    “But I don’t think you’re going see that effort from the group that just completed this exercise.”

  • Needed: 45 more voting machines

    Lancaster County is short 45 voting machines of the required number required by state law, and there’s not much the county can do about it.
    “The election commission is an unfunded mandate,” said Rick Crimminger, Lancaster County Election Commission chairman. “The state says we got to have it, but doesn’t fund it. When you have this kind of growth, you got to deal with it.
    “It used to be 35,000 registered voters in the county and now it’s up to 58,000,” he said.

  • Town rallies around Talf

    CHARLOTTE – Talf Wrenn, 23, has been a fighter since he was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy at just three-years-old. The disorder generally affects the voluntary muscles in early childhood, which ultimately placed him in a wheelchair.
    On March 27, Wrenn began what his family – parents Will and Meg and siblings Caroline and Hammond – feared would be his last fight. He went to a local doctor for what was treated as a cold, but later that night he stopped breathing. His heart had stopped.

  • African pro-life activist to speak

    Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church

    Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, the Women’s Enrichment Center and the Fatherhood Project are partnering to host the internationally acclaimed pro-life speaker and strategist Obianuju “Uju” Ekeocha next week.

  • Cost estimates too low for sidewalks near ILMS

    Lancaster County and school district officials may have to start over on a plan to build sidewalks near Indian Land Middle School on River Road.
    County Administrator Steve Willis told Lancaster County Council members Monday that S.C. Department of Transportation cost estimates for the project were too low.
    “They gave us inaccurate cost data,” Willis said. “It should’ve been more, but I don’t have the final figures yet.”

  • City eyes Main St. ‘road diet’

    Changes could be coming this year to the lane configuration on part of Main Street.
    Lancaster City Council gave its unanimous approval Tuesday to a proposed “road diet” that would turn the current four-lane section of Main Street from Woodland Drive to Barr Street into two lanes with a center turn lane.
    A “road diet” is a lane reduction with the goal of improving safety and to provide additional space for other modes of travel, explained City Administrator Flip Hutfles.

  • The fun is back!

    The revamped playground at Stevens Park in Kershaw opened Thursday afternoon.