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Local

  • Experience most-cited attribute in school races

    The race for three contested seats on the Lancaster County school board features five veteran educators and challenges to longtime incumbents Bobby Parker and Janice Dabney.
    Neil Couch and Melissa Jones-Horton are running against Dabney in District 5. John Mahaffey is running against board Chairman Parker in District 3. Ken Buck and Chris Campbell are running for the District 7 seat after incumbent Don McCorkle chose not to run again. And District 1 incumbent Melvin Stroble faces no opposition. 

  • Grandpa’s Masonic gavel turns up at downtown antique store

    Tim Catoe wandered into The Shops on Main on a whim last week and found a local relic buried among the antiques and artifacts for sale there.
    Catoe noticed an old wooden gavel faintly inscribed: “Camp Creek Masonic Lodge, R.W. Parker, W.M., 1947.”
    “I thought, man, that’s pretty neat,” said Catoe, who is a member of the Antioch Lodge. 

  • McMaster, Smith joust over issues

    In the first of two statewide TV debates, Gov. Henry McMaster and Democratic challenger James Smith drew clear distinctions on many issues Wednesday night and sharply clashed on a few.
    McMaster repeatedly focused on lower taxes and less regulation as the key to the state’s prosperity now and in the future, while Smith urged raising teacher salaries, building infrastructure and improving health care by accepting federal Medicaid help under Obamacare.

  • What good thing will happen Saturday?

    Something strange happened at the 2017 Widows Sons Masonic Riders Charity Ride and Auction.
    Now, you may find this bizarre, since I’m a 1982 University of South Carolina graduate. But last year at the annual fundraiser that benefits HOPE (Helping Other People Effectively) of Lancaster, I found myself in a heated bidding war over a Clemson University mug.
    I was prepared to pay $30 for it that day, but in the end, it didn’t cost anything.

  • What good thing will happen Saturday?

    Something strange happened at the 2017 Widows Sons Masonic Riders Charity Ride and Auction.
    Now, you may find this bizarre, since I’m a 1982 University of South Carolina graduate. But last year at the annual fundraiser that benefits HOPE (Helping Other People Effectively) of Lancaster, I found myself in a heated bidding war over a Clemson University mug.
    I was prepared to pay $30 for it that day, but in the end, it didn’t cost anything.

  • Hanging Rock, Buford included in Liberty Trail

    Lancaster County’s two major American Revolution battlefields will be included in a 19-site section of the state’s new Liberty Trail, stretching from the Buford Battleground south to Moncks Corner.
    The S.C. Battleground Preservation Trust and the American Battlefield Trust have joined forces to preserve the state’s Revolutionary War battlefields. The nonprofits are raising money, acquiring land and plan to provide educational and recreational opportunities for the public.

  • County’s insurer settles Tunnell suit

    Lancaster County’s liability insurer will pay $20,000 to Keith Tunnell to end his federal discrimination suit against the county government, county council members Larry Honeycutt and Charlene McGriff and former council member Bob Bundy.
    The dismissal and settlement were granted Friday in U.S. District Court in Rock Hill.
    Lancaster County Administrator Steve Willis said the county’s insurance carrier, the S.C. Counties Property & Liability Trust, was paying the settlement.

  • Gathering our community’s resources for hurricane aid

    Evelyn Springs, a real pro at stocking up on food and supplies, was ready for Hurricane Florence last month, with a pile of provisions at her home all set to go.
    But the 64-year-old owner of Catering by Evelyn survived the storm without needing them.
    “What in the world,” Springs asked herself, “am I going to do with all of this stuff?”
    Springs felt God telling her to take the supplies to the people who needed them, she recalled this week. She targeted Wilmington, N.C., where the storm had caused severe damage.

  • Lancaster paramedics scrambling to help survivors in Panama City

    Tammy Varnadore and Tamara Collins knew what to expect after their 500-mile overnight trek to Panama City, Fla., but the devastation still floored them.
    Railroad cars lay on their sides, dragged far away from their tracks. Buildings lacked entire roofs. Mobile homes were tossed together, blocks away from their addresses.
    “They have no water, no power,” Varnadore said Friday. “This place is destroyed.”
    The Lancaster paramedics left for Hurricane Michael’s impact zone around 5 p.m. Tuesday.

  • Desperate gibberish from 4-inch windows in metal doors

    A loud, jarring buzz bounced off the concrete-block walls, past the clanking metal doors and the occasional yells of the people trapped behind them.
    The source of the annoyance, a man incarcerated months before for receiving stolen goods, was holding down a call button and banging repeatedly on the metal door of his cell with his fists.
    “Larry! Larry! Larry!” the inmate hollered in desperation.
    Capt. Larry Deason walked calmly to the cell and peered through a 4-inch-tall window at the man’s unkempt face.