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Government

  • Filings begin for ’18 political races

    The official election season has begun, with several candidates already planning to seek office in the June party primaries.
    “These non-presidential election years are normally a little slower, but it’s not been that way here,” said Lancaster County Elections Director Mary Ann Hudson.
    “This office has been pretty busy with the upcoming Indian Land incorporation on March 27, as well as the filings.”
    This year, the offices of governor, members of Congress, the S.C. House and other statewide and local offices are up for election.

  • Rep. Norrell: Make ‘revenge porn’ illegal

    Rep. Mandy Powers Norrell has introduced legislation to make revenge porn a crime in South Carolina, targeting the latest form of online harassment and breach of privacy.
    The Lancaster Democrat’s bill in the S.C. House would make the crime a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 or as much as a year in prison.

  • City moves to cut cost of upkeep at its parks

    In a cost-cutting move, the city of Lancaster plans to withdraw from the Lancaster County Parks and Recreation Commission, and Kershaw and Heath Springs might not be far behind.
    Lancaster will take back from the county the responsibility for maintaining all of its smaller parks. That will save nearly half of the $98,000 it has been paying the county each year, mostly for grass-mowing services.
    The county will still maintain the large parks in the city – the Springdale Road complex and Buckelew Park.

  • Chester legislator Delleney won’t run again

    Landmark News Service

    Long-time S.C. House member Greg Delleney, whose district includes Chester and York counties, announced Tuesday that he would not seek re-election.
    Delleney, R-43, is Chester County’s only resident legislator, a House member for nearly 27 years. He is chair of the House Judiciary Committee, a position he has held since 2012.

  • Council limits late fees on water bills

    Lancaster City Council has voted unanimously to amend the city’s water contract and metering policy to limit late fees.
    The new policy, approved last week, allows each water customer four utility disconnect extensions per calendar year. This allows customers delinquent in paying their bill by the 15th of the month to essentially extend their bill seven business days past the 25th of the month while paying just one $25 late fee.
    Under the old policy, customers paid one $25 late fee on the 15th and another on the 25th if the bill still wasn’t paid.

  • New revenue source would bolster ethics investigations

    Larissa Johnson
    Carolina Reporter

    Lobbyists fill the second-floor lobby of the State House while the S.C. legislature is in session.
    Relationships between legislators and lobbyists, especially when money is involved, is a key focus of the State Ethics Commission.
    The commission, responsible for enforcing ethics laws for more than 24,000 elected officials and candidates, has been without a lawyer since October, a vacancy that could hamper enforcement of ethical-conduct laws.

  • Democrat Smith stumps in IL

    At his first campaign stop in Lancaster County, Democratic gubernatorial candidate James Smith introduced himself to about 100 attendees Thursday night with a story about 9/11.
    “We all remember where we were on that day,” said Smith, an 11-term S.C. House member from Columbia. “I had the chance to visit Ground Zero, and it just assaulted all the senses, sight and sound.”

    While he was there, crews removed a victim’s body from the rubble.

  • Kershaw town council denies $25K KCPC request

    KERSHAW – The Kershaw Community Park Council on Monday asked the town council for $25,000 to secure an equal grant for the playground-replacement project at Stevens Park, but the council turned down the request.
    The $25,000 would have won KCPC a matching amount from the J. Marion Sims Foundation, a big step toward the community group’s $375,000 goal.
    “We just don’t have it,” Kershaw Mayor Mark Dorman told anxious KCPC board members after council discussed the matter behind closed doors for more than an hour.

  • Morrow lone candidate in Heath Springs race

    Tameka Morrow, a teacher at North Elementary School, is running unopposed in the race for the open seat on Heath Springs Town Council.
    “Everyone has a voice, but I’d like to put the voice of the younger generation – the generation of the offspring of the retirees,” Morrow said. “It’s time for a younger generation to come in, and I would like to put a fresh face on council.”

  • Quinn Jr. gets fine, probation, no prison

    Former House Majority Leader Richard Quinn Jr. has been sentenced to two years’ probation after pleading guilty to misconduct in office.
    Circuit Judge Carmen Mullen delivered the sentence 9 a.m. Monday at a hearing in Beaufort. In addition to probation, Mullen sentenced Quinn to 500 hours of community service and a $1,000 fine.
    Special Prosecutor David Pascoe, who argued for Quinn to receive the maximum sentence of one year in prison, objected to Mullen’s sentencing, but the judge didn’t let him get far.