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Education

  • LCSD revamps teaching process

    The Lancaster County School District has partnered with Discovery Education, which is affiliated with TV’s Discovery Channel, to revamp how the district teaches its students.
    “It’s a great opportunity for our district to move forward academically,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps.
    “When kids work in school they say things like, ‘Well when will I need algebra?’ I’ve heard kids say that when I was in the classroom. This will give us the answer to that question, providing them real-world experience.”

  • Make-up days assigned for Hurricane Florence absences

    Make-up days have been assigned by the Lancaster County School District after Hurricane Florence closed schools Sept. 14 and Monday. 

    “We had leaks in buildings that never leaked before,” Superintendent Jonathan Phipps said. “The wind and blowing rain just caused problems that don’t normally happen.

    “To be honest it was kind of amazing how we got everything ready for Tuesday, and it speaks volumes to how our guys came together,” he said.  

  • Kim Perry named state’s PE Teacher of the Year

    For 15 years, Kim Perry had mostly taught her PE students how to play basketball, volleyball and other team sports, but that changed last fall because of one Lancaster High student.
    “There was a girl in my class who had some anxiety and said she hated PE… because she wasn’t an athlete,” Perry recalled this week. “And I said, ‘Honey, you don’t have to be an athlete to be in PE.’”
    The student said being forced to play team sports made her feel bad, because the more athletic teens mocked her.

  • False alarm on Sunday’s school alert

    The Lancaster County schools issued an alert Sunday about a report that a couple was telling people a van would pick up schoolchildren Monday morning, but it ended up being a false alarm caused by miscommunication between a bus driver and a resident.
    “Fortunately, it seems in this situation it was an honest mistake and miscommunication,” said school district Safety Director Bryan Vaughn.

  • County equipping more school resource officers

    Lancaster County Council unanimously voted Aug. 27 to spend up to $62,000 to equip five certified school resource officers.  

    The equipment includes computers, radio/walkie talkies, duty and tactical gear, Tasers and body-worn cameras.

    The equipment is for two new SRO positions, as well as for three more deputies recently named SROs. 

    The salaries, insurance and fringe benefits for are paid by the school district, with the county picking up other related costs. 

  • Schools ban unauthorized drone flights

    The Lancaster County School District has prohibited the use of drones on school property, unless the operator first clears it with the school district and has a commercial drone license from the Federal Aviation Administration.

    “We always want to do all we can to keep our students, staff and visitors safe,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps in a LCSD release. “We can’t ignore the potential for a drone flown improperly to put people and property at risk.”

  • Schools: Parents no longer can just show up for lunch

    Parents will no longer be allowed to eat lunch with their children at Lancaster County schools whenever they choose, but will be welcome on specific days set aside by the school district.
    Safety Director Bryan Vaughn said that the district came to the decision to end the practice after a 2017-18 school year internal safety audit.
    “It wasn’t an arbitrary decision,” Vaughn said. “We’ve been discussing this for six to eight months, and getting input from teachers, administration and parents from schools.”

  • ILHS aims for green certification

    There’s red clay galore at construction sites across the Lancaster County School District these days, but the biggest project is going green.
    The new Indian Land High School, scheduled for completion in 2020, will be the district’s first LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified school.
    “We’re very excited,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps. “It will save taxpayers money in the long run, which is always a positive. Responsibility-wise, it was a good thing to do.”

  • CCA starts its year with decade-high enrollment

    Robin Knight
    Carolina Christian Academy

    The first week of school is in the wraps for the 210 students enrolled at Carolina Christian Academy in Lancaster.
    The county’s only private school welcomed many familiar faces as well as a record-breaking number of new students. This year CCA has its highest enrollment in a decade, serving students from K3 to 12th grade.

  • 2 IL students suspended after alleged threats

    Two Indian Land students, a 15-year-old at the high school and a 12-year-old middle schooler, have been suspended and recommended for expulsion after being accused of making violent threats while in school.
    The 15-year-old boy was overheard Wednesday saying, “I’m going to shoot up this f---ing school,” according to an initial report from the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office.