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Education

  • Native American Studies Center gets $10,000 donation

    USC Lancaster

    USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center has received a $10,000 donation from OceanaGold/Haile Operation, which will sponsor four speakers for the monthly Lunch and Learn programs, held the third Friday of each month in the center’s galleries.  
    The four Lunch and Learn programs include:
    April 20: Dr. Katherine Osburn, Arizona State University, “The ‘Identified Full-Bloods’ in Mississippi: Race and Choctaw Identity, 1898-1918.”

  • Schools adopt text-alert system

    The Lancaster County School District has installed a new emergency alert system that can send information to parents, teachers and students instantly via text message.
    “It’s very similar to what’s used on university campuses. That’s the model we’re after,” said Bryan Vaughn, the district’s safety director. “This give folks immediate info, and it’s good because I can access it anywhere… whether I’m on the side of the road, in a classroom or in the middle of a situation.

  • Sidewalk plan in the works near ILMS

    Lancaster County is targeting a $112,000 grant to build sidewalks near Indian Land Middle School on River Road, a move to address student safety.
    A 300-signature petition pushing the S.C. Department of Transportation to install sidewalks was given to the school district in November. Signatures were collected by concerned Indian Land Middle parent Pam Houge.
    SCDOT got involved and the Lancaster County School District was on board with the petition.

  • New school switches to Eagles mascot

    The mascot of the new Van Wyck Elementary School will be the Eagles rather than the Braves, after the Catawba Indian Nation and other community members objected to the school board’s initial choice.
    The board voted unanimously Tuesday night to change the mascot after a meeting with Catawba Chief Bill Harris and the school’s naming committee.
    “[We] realized our effort to honor and pay tribute to the Catawbas would actually do the opposite,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps.

  • AJ cleanup expands: 6 weeks, $3M

    Andrew Jackson Middle School’s plan for a two-week, $1 million fire cleanup has ballooned into perhaps six weeks and $3 million.
    “The latest date we’ll reopen is the Monday after spring break, April 16,” Superintendent Jonathan Phipps said. “Of course challenges could arise that we can’t foresee, but we’re confident we can open by then.”

  • Tribute to 17 Parkland victims strains local students, teachers

    Students and teachers filed silently out of classrooms at Andrew Jackson High School at 10 a.m. Wednesday.
    Some leaned against doorways. Kids sat on the floor with their knees up to their chests, heads buried in crossed arms. The only sound was sniffling, as many, including several teachers, fought back tears.
    For 17 somber minutes, AJ mourned the 17 students and faculty shot to death Feb. 14 in Parkland, Fla.

  • No walkouts expected at local schools

    Lancaster County students today will mark the one-month anniversary of the Florida school massacre, but school officials here do not expect the “walkout” planned at many campuses across the country.
    Plans have been announced for specific in-school commemorations at Lancaster, Indian Land, Buford and Andrew Jackson high schools.

  • School-safety briefing at Buford High

    The Lancaster County School District will hold a school-safety information session at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in Buford High School’s library.
    The session, led by Safety Director Bryan Vaughn, is meant to show parents what has been done and what is still in the works for keeping their children safe. It is the third session sponsored by the district, with the first two at Indian Land and North Elementary schools.

  • Heath Springs students pitch detailed upgrades for school

    Heath Springs Elementary School students wowed Lancaster County school board members with a detailed presentation about upgrades they want for their school.
    The first, third and fifth graders, with parents in tow, marched into the district building Feb. 20 to address the board about the proposed renovation and redesign. And they all presented their case with little to no aid from their teachers.

  • AJMS staffers get marching orders as fire recovery starts

    Teachers from fire-damaged Andrew Jackson Middle School filled every seat and lined the walls at the nearby high school library Thursday, as Superintendent Jonathan Phipps and district staff pledged support to the faculty and laid out plans for the weeks-long recovery.
    “To the Andrew Jackson Middle School family, we are sorry that this happened,” said Sheri Watson, principal of Heath Springs Elementary, one of the campuses where the AJMS students will attend classes during the cleanup from Thursday night’s fire.