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Education

  • Schools: Parents no longer can just show up for lunch

    Parents will no longer be allowed to eat lunch with their children at Lancaster County schools whenever they choose, but will be welcome on specific days set aside by the school district.
    Safety Director Bryan Vaughn said that the district came to the decision to end the practice after a 2017-18 school year internal safety audit.
    “It wasn’t an arbitrary decision,” Vaughn said. “We’ve been discussing this for six to eight months, and getting input from teachers, administration and parents from schools.”

  • ILHS aims for green certification

    There’s red clay galore at construction sites across the Lancaster County School District these days, but the biggest project is going green.
    The new Indian Land High School, scheduled for completion in 2020, will be the district’s first LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified school.
    “We’re very excited,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps. “It will save taxpayers money in the long run, which is always a positive. Responsibility-wise, it was a good thing to do.”

  • CCA starts its year with decade-high enrollment

    Robin Knight
    Carolina Christian Academy

    The first week of school is in the wraps for the 210 students enrolled at Carolina Christian Academy in Lancaster.
    The county’s only private school welcomed many familiar faces as well as a record-breaking number of new students. This year CCA has its highest enrollment in a decade, serving students from K3 to 12th grade.

  • 2 IL students suspended after alleged threats

    Two Indian Land students, a 15-year-old at the high school and a 12-year-old middle schooler, have been suspended and recommended for expulsion after being accused of making violent threats while in school.
    The 15-year-old boy was overheard Wednesday saying, “I’m going to shoot up this f---ing school,” according to an initial report from the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office.

  • Schools iron out bus routes for 7,000 kids

    With 7,000 students riding buses the first week of school, the Lancaster County School District has been fielding complaints about late drop-off times and is working out route changes to solve the problems.
    “The latest I’ve heard of is 5:45 p.m. for the last child dropped off from high school, and they got on the bus at 4 p.m.,” said Bryan Vaughn, LCSD safety and transportation director. “In the first week of school, we always have high call volume.”

  • School bells ring!

    The starting gun sounded Monday morning and 13,000 Lancaster County students filled the halls of 23 schools, as the district hit its mark for wrapping up construction projects just in time and the first days of classes had no major hitches.
    The new Van Wyck Elementary School opened to much excitement, with the finishing touch of 35-mph flashing speed-zone signs installed over the weekend to slow the traffic along busy U.S. 521.

  • Native artisan Beckee Garris is NASC's new artist-in-residence

    Ashley Lowrimore

    For The Lancaster News

    Traditional artist Beckee Garris will appear at USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center as artist-in-residence through December, demonstrating pottery and basket-making techniques and sharing Catawba oral histories and traditions.

    A member of the Catawba Indian Nation, Garris will alternate weekends making pottery and two different types of basket forms from reeds and long leaf pine needles.

  • VWES teachers show up for work

    Cars and pickups, their doors open and tailgates down, lined the driveway of the new Van Wyck Elementary School on Monday as teachers unloaded classroom contents on their first day in the new building.
    “It’s everything from moving into the room, decorating and organizing the room, and then curriculum comes next. We’re just trying to get the room ready for kids,” said fourth-grade teacher Shannon Wilson. “It’s exciting, very exciting. The building is beautiful, and it’s a nice new space.”

  • Rowdy teachers raise the roooof!

    More than 1,300 teachers packed Lancaster High School’s gym Tuesday to celebrate the previous year’s hard work, recognize four outstanding teachers and kick off the new year with the district’s largest teacher pep rally.
    Lauren Watts from Harrisburg Elementary, Leslie Parker from Kershaw Elementary, Kimberly Sowell from South Middle and Lisa Knox from Indian Land High were picked from 200 nominees to receive this year’s Celebrate Great Teaching Awards.
    Knox, the high school and district-wide award recipient, was humbled by the experience.

  • Bond projects wrap up in time for school

    Major school bond referendum projects are wrapping up across Lancaster County as the start of school on Aug. 20 looms on the horizon.
    Van Wyck Elementary School has passed all its inspections, and the last finishing touches are being done on the building. Workers moved in furniture throughout the building this week, in anticipation of teachers coming in Monday, Aug. 13.
    Andrew Jackson and Buford high schools have gotten new, pre-fabricated press boxes for each school’s football fields. Both were installed Friday.