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Education

  • Reaching for the sky

    The New Indian Land High School, a gleaming, modern campus full of amenities and aspirations, is rising out of the red clay along U.S. 521, with footings being poured and walls jutting skyward.
    Facilities Director David Small is pleased with the construction progress at what will be the Lancaster County School District’s newest high school, with $90 million in construction scheduled for completion in 2020.

  • Norman, Mosteller, Parker visit BHS government class

    Rep. Ralph Norman told a group of high school students Tuesday that he’s never worked a day in his life.
    “When you pick a career, one of the most satisfying things is doing what you’re interested in,” said the Fifth District congressman. “You do that, and you’ll find your niche.”
    Norman, along with Lancaster County Council member Billy Mosteller and school board Chair Bobby Parker, spent almost an hour talking the 28 students in Wes James’ first period government class at Buford High School.

  • LCSD revamps teaching process

    The Lancaster County School District has partnered with Discovery Education, which is affiliated with TV’s Discovery Channel, to revamp how the district teaches its students.
    “It’s a great opportunity for our district to move forward academically,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps.
    “When kids work in school they say things like, ‘Well when will I need algebra?’ I’ve heard kids say that when I was in the classroom. This will give us the answer to that question, providing them real-world experience.”

  • Make-up days assigned for Hurricane Florence absences

    Make-up days have been assigned by the Lancaster County School District after Hurricane Florence closed schools Sept. 14 and Monday. 

    “We had leaks in buildings that never leaked before,” Superintendent Jonathan Phipps said. “The wind and blowing rain just caused problems that don’t normally happen.

    “To be honest it was kind of amazing how we got everything ready for Tuesday, and it speaks volumes to how our guys came together,” he said.  

  • False alarm on Sunday’s school alert

    The Lancaster County schools issued an alert Sunday about a report that a couple was telling people a van would pick up schoolchildren Monday morning, but it ended up being a false alarm caused by miscommunication between a bus driver and a resident.
    “Fortunately, it seems in this situation it was an honest mistake and miscommunication,” said school district Safety Director Bryan Vaughn.

  • Schools: Parents no longer can just show up for lunch

    Parents will no longer be allowed to eat lunch with their children at Lancaster County schools whenever they choose, but will be welcome on specific days set aside by the school district.
    Safety Director Bryan Vaughn said that the district came to the decision to end the practice after a 2017-18 school year internal safety audit.
    “It wasn’t an arbitrary decision,” Vaughn said. “We’ve been discussing this for six to eight months, and getting input from teachers, administration and parents from schools.”

  • 2 IL students suspended after alleged threats

    Two Indian Land students, a 15-year-old at the high school and a 12-year-old middle schooler, have been suspended and recommended for expulsion after being accused of making violent threats while in school.
    The 15-year-old boy was overheard Wednesday saying, “I’m going to shoot up this f---ing school,” according to an initial report from the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office.

  • Schools iron out bus routes for 7,000 kids

    With 7,000 students riding buses the first week of school, the Lancaster County School District has been fielding complaints about late drop-off times and is working out route changes to solve the problems.
    “The latest I’ve heard of is 5:45 p.m. for the last child dropped off from high school, and they got on the bus at 4 p.m.,” said Bryan Vaughn, LCSD safety and transportation director. “In the first week of school, we always have high call volume.”

  • School bells ring!

    The starting gun sounded Monday morning and 13,000 Lancaster County students filled the halls of 23 schools, as the district hit its mark for wrapping up construction projects just in time and the first days of classes had no major hitches.
    The new Van Wyck Elementary School opened to much excitement, with the finishing touch of 35-mph flashing speed-zone signs installed over the weekend to slow the traffic along busy U.S. 521.

  • Native artisan Beckee Garris is NASC's new artist-in-residence

    Ashley Lowrimore

    For The Lancaster News

    Traditional artist Beckee Garris will appear at USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center as artist-in-residence through December, demonstrating pottery and basket-making techniques and sharing Catawba oral histories and traditions.

    A member of the Catawba Indian Nation, Garris will alternate weekends making pottery and two different types of basket forms from reeds and long leaf pine needles.