.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • Truckload of generosity

    Brooklyn Springs Elementary was transformed into Santa’s grotto Thursday after 100 volunteers from Keller Williams Fort Mill, decked out as elves and reindeer, showed up to spread some Christmas cheer.
    This is the third year that the Texas-based real estate company has organized a Christmas event for the school. The company provided a holiday shop where children could pick two presents to give to their loved ones, in a truck parked in the school parking lot.

  • 'Is this really what adulting feels like?'

    Andrew Jackson High School students packed the school’s cafeteria and opened folders containing their new identities – glimpsing the realities and the possibilities of life away from home.
    Each student received a calculator, an occupation, a family, a monthly income and a list of financial obligations and opportunities.
    Students like Chloë Mungo soon found themselves scrambling to make ends meet amid credit card debt, student loans, housing payments, car payments and insurance premiums.

  • New Lu Playground at KES merges activity, video game

    Kershaw Elementary is paving the way for advanced physical education classes in the state with a new, interactive gaming system projected on its gymnasium walls.
    The Lu Playground, a Canadian device, uses a 3D camera and light and audio system to project images and programs on the wall in the gym, immersing students in different video game type activities. It has about 27 applications for students to use, but adds one or two new activities each month.
    The first of its kind in South Carolina, the program has been used in 20 different countries around the world.

  • Back to the books

    More than 13,000 students filled the halls of Lancaster County schools Monday, ready to begin another year.
    Superintendent Jonathan Phipps said the first day went off without major hitches.
    “On the first day of school, we send out someone from the district office to visit every school to make sure that everything’s smooth and see if there’s anything we can help with,” he said. “I’ve heard nothing but positive things. Everything’s been very smooth.”

  • School district celebrates great teaching

    Tuesday was truly a day for teachers.
    The Lancaster High School Multipurpose Building bubbled over with an atmosphere of fun, excitement and camaraderie as hundreds of the school district’s educators joined together to celebrate the start of the school year.Superintendent Jonathan Phipps welcomed the 171 new teachers and administrators joining the Lancaster County School District this year and recognized many of the district’s veteran educators.

  • Most construction wrapping up

    It’s been a construction-laden summer for the Lancaster County School District to prepare for the start of classes.
    The car rider access points at Buford Middle and Buford, Heath Springs and Kershaw elementary schools will look different this year.
    The new performing arts center at Andrew Jackson High School is opening to students this fall and construction of a bigger Indian Land High School on U.S. 521 is continuing.

    Traffic changes

  • Schools OK $121 million budget with tax increase

    The Lancaster County school board unanimously approved a $121.4 million budget for fiscal 2019-20 Tuesday night, including pay raises for school staff and a slight tax hike.
    With expenditures budgeted to exceed revenues by $5.4 million, the board decided to balance the budget with money from its general fund, which holds $23.9 million.
    School Superintendent Jonathan Phipps said the district predicts an overage in expenditures each year, but it hasn’t actually had to dip into its savings in the past half decade.

  • Discovery School learns gardening

    Twenty excited students ran around six raised garden beds in the courtyard at Discovery School on May 22. One stopped to look at a tender new plant and shouted, “I planted that.”
    The young gardeners were delighted to see the fruits of their labor that began in early March.

  • Platts new director of S.C. Arts Commission

    After serving the Lancaster County School District for 15 years, arts and science coordinator David Platts has been named executive director of the S.C. Arts Commission.  
    On July 1, Platts will step in to lead the state agency in its effort to increase public participation in the arts.
    The commission provides grants, directs programs and forges partnerships in the areas of arts education, artist development and community arts development. During fiscal 2018, the commission awarded 398 grants totaling more than $4 million.

  • GRAD-ELATION!

    Lancaster County schools dished out diplomas by the hundreds Friday, rocketing 789 students into their futures – whether it be at a university, technical school or in the workforce.