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Education

  • New local scholarship to reward good deeds

    From release

    A new scholarship opportunity including a mentoring component has been established for local high school juniors.
    The Lancaster County Good Samaritan Scholarship was founded in April by Lancaster native and retired business owner Marion Taylor. It is modeled after the Bill Maness Good Samaritan Scholarship Foundation of Atlanta, of which Taylor was a founding member.

  • David Platts named county’s 2018 conservation educator

    From release

    David Platts has been named Lancaster County’s 2018 Conservation Educator of the Year.

    The award was presented May 17 at the Lancaster Soil and Water Conservation District’s Annual Affiliate Members Awards and Recognition Program.

    Each year, the soil and water conservation district recognizes a teacher in Lancaster County who is doing an outstanding job educating students about the importance of our natural resources. 

  • NASC honors the life, work of Will Goins

    Family, friends and admirers gathered Thursday evening for the opening reception of the new exhibit “Artist, Advocate & Leader: Celebrating the Life and Work of Dr. Will Moreau Goins” at USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center.

    Visitors wandered around the colorful exhibit, examining the variety of art on display, including photography, paintings, regalia and beadwork, before hearing a few words about the artist from the center’s director, Dr. Stephen Criswell.

  • USCL reaching out for more partnerships with community

    From release
    USC Lancaster has formed its first Town-Gown Advisory Council, in an effort to encourage more partnerships with the community and create collaborative opportunities.

  • Lancaster teens win top honors in poultry, garden competitions

    Lancaster County teens Daniel Hilgendorf and Charis Grabbe both won top awards in statewide competitions this year for their respective expertise in poultry showmanship and gardening.
    Daniel and Charis are both participants in the 4-H program delivered by the Cooperative Extension Service, which provides opportunities for kids and young people to “learn by doing” in areas such as health, science and agriculture.
    The Lancaster County 4-H Program has served almost 2,000 youths throughout the county over the past year.

  • AJ fine arts students in musical play ‘Cinderella’

    Chloe Mungo
    For The Lancaster News

    An enchanting classic takes the stage this weekend as the Andrew Jackson High School Fine Arts Department presents “Cinderella: The Musical.”
    The talented cast includes Jurnee Ingram as Cinderella and Rhett Wilson as Prince Charming. The production is full of “dancing, singing and pageantry,” said director Katrina Bernsdorff, with choreography by Shannon Bradberry and her dance focus students.  

  • Reaching for the sky

    The New Indian Land High School, a gleaming, modern campus full of amenities and aspirations, is rising out of the red clay along U.S. 521, with footings being poured and walls jutting skyward.
    Facilities Director David Small is pleased with the construction progress at what will be the Lancaster County School District’s newest high school, with $90 million in construction scheduled for completion in 2020.

  • Norman, Mosteller, Parker visit BHS government class

    Rep. Ralph Norman told a group of high school students Tuesday that he’s never worked a day in his life.
    “When you pick a career, one of the most satisfying things is doing what you’re interested in,” said the Fifth District congressman. “You do that, and you’ll find your niche.”
    Norman, along with Lancaster County Council member Billy Mosteller and school board Chair Bobby Parker, spent almost an hour talking the 28 students in Wes James’ first period government class at Buford High School.

  • LCSD revamps teaching process

    The Lancaster County School District has partnered with Discovery Education, which is affiliated with TV’s Discovery Channel, to revamp how the district teaches its students.
    “It’s a great opportunity for our district to move forward academically,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps.
    “When kids work in school they say things like, ‘Well when will I need algebra?’ I’ve heard kids say that when I was in the classroom. This will give us the answer to that question, providing them real-world experience.”

  • Make-up days assigned for Hurricane Florence absences

    Make-up days have been assigned by the Lancaster County School District after Hurricane Florence closed schools Sept. 14 and Monday. 

    “We had leaks in buildings that never leaked before,” Superintendent Jonathan Phipps said. “The wind and blowing rain just caused problems that don’t normally happen.

    “To be honest it was kind of amazing how we got everything ready for Tuesday, and it speaks volumes to how our guys came together,” he said.