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Education

  • AME Zion youth oratory winners

    From release

    Seventeen young people, ages 12-18, participated in the annual Oratorical Expose held during September’s 98th Session of the Lancaster District AME Zion Church Conference.

    Before a standing-room only congregation at Mt. Tabor AME Zion Church, students spoke on topics such as the pros and cons of social media, reasons young people are leaving the church and suggestions to encourage them to stay, and what “#blacklivesmatter” means to them.

  • Antioch pumpkin patch full of fall fun, learning

    Indian Land Elementary School students filed off the bus Thursday into a field with hundreds of pumpkins at Antioch Baptist Church’s seventh-annual Great Pumpkin Patch.

    LeighAnn Edmondson and Tiffany Evans’ special-needs classes ran straight to the pumpkins sitting on pallets, tables and bleachers.

    Edmondson said her class has learned about the lifecycle and different sizes and colors of pumpkins.

  • Indian Land accounts for all growth in local schools

    The number of students attending Indian Land schools has increased more than 10 percent since this time last year, while the population of most of the county’s other schools has declined slightly.
    Of the county’s four high schools, only Indian Land High increased its student body from last school year.
    Indian Land’s school growth is driven mostly by the Panhandle’s two elementary schools.

  • Irma make-up day Oct. 9

    The Lancaster County School District has scheduled Oct. 9 as a make-up day for the day missed because of Hurricane Irma.
    School was canceled Sept. 11 as winds and rain from Irma passed through the Palmetto State.
    Oct. 9 was the next day students were not scheduled to be in school. It had been had been planned as a teacher workday.
    “We believe it’s important to use it as a make-up day,” said LCSD Superintendent Jonathan Phipps. “We still face the possibility of winter weather and more missed days.”

  • Library’s summer readers help ‘Build a Better World’

    Ashley Lowrimore

    For The Lancaster News

    Nearly 2,000 readers in Lancaster County – signed up to “Build a Better World” at the annual summer reading program at the Lancaster, Del Webb and Kershaw libraries. 

    Held June 1-July 28, the building-themed event included patrons of all ages who attended special events and registered to read books and win prizes.

  • Teachers’ shirts spell out messages to kids

    Lancaster High School teachers celebrated teacher appreciation week by giving a little appreciation and encouragement back to their students.
    Each day of the week, they had an activity to celebrate. One day was hat day and on Thursday it was Scrabble day.
    Each department at the school created a message for students and wore a Scrabble letter cutout, or a shirt with the letter to school. When all the teachers stood together, it would spell their message out.

  • 82 USCL grads cross the finish line

    Karen Young, 71, was smiling ear to ear as she accepted her degree from USC Lancaster Dean Walt Collins on Saturday – the oldest of 82 grads to take the stage.

  • Honoring achievers, past and present

    The Lancaster County School District held its annual celebration of excellence luncheon Tuesday, inducting three new members to the Lancaster County School Hall of Honor and also recognizing more than 350 students and 44 retiring teachers.
    Thelathia Bailey, Joseph Gregory and Martha Noblitt were all inducted posthumously into the hall of fame.
    The families and friends accepted the awards for Bailey, Gregory and Noblitt during the ceremony at Second Baptist Church in Lancaster, many fighting back emotions and grateful for their loved ones’ induction.

  • Deputies respond to rumor at Rucker

    Sheriff’s deputies showed up at A.R. Rucker Middle School Friday morning in response to rumors that someone was planning a shooting at the school.
    School district Safety and Transportation Director Bryan Vaughn said the rumors sparked an investigation but turned up no evidence.

  • Top-to-bottom overhaul done, AJMS reopens for excited kids

    Nearly two months after fire blackened Andrew Jackson Middle School, students, teachers and faculty jammed the halls again Tuesday morning, delighted to be back home.
    “It’s been wonderful to be back,” said Kelly Phillips, assistant principal at AJMS. “There’s been a lot of excitement in the air. A lot of people have been commenting on how bright the school looks and how clean the walls are.”
    Steve Mann, a seventh-grade math teacher, said everyone was relieved and eager to get back to normal.