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Education

  • Moving day for LHS administrators

    After major construction delays on multiple bond-referendum projects, Lancaster High School administrators are finally moving into their new office space.
    “Oh goodness, it’s like Christmas,” said an excited Rosalyn Mood, principal at LHS. “It gives the school a whole new look.
    “It’s so much easier to give directions now. It’s much more accessible, not only for our students and parents, but also for our visitors. It’s a whole new feel – like getting your house done over,” she said.

  • LCSD combats teacher shortage

    As Lancaster County schools rush to complete major construction projects for the start of the school year, one thing worries Superintendent Jonathan Phipps even more – a shortage of teachers.
    Going into this fall, the Lancaster County School District faced nearly 300 openings among 1,005 teaching positions.

  • School registration dates set

    Lancaster County School District

    Lancaster County School District has set registration dates for the 2018-19 school year.

    No general school fees will be charged this year, although fees may be charged for activities such as band, driver education, clubs and yearbooks.

    School insurance will not be sold during registration.

    What students new to a school must bring

  • Lancaster teacher to show students how we get food

    From release

    FLORENCE – Lisa Huss, a teacher at Lancaster’s South Middle School, was among 49 S.C. educators who recently learned how to bring agriculture into their classrooms.

    The South Carolina Farm Bureau Federation (SCFB) hosted its annual Ag in the Classroom Summer Teacher Institute June 18-22 in Florence,  where teachers from pre-K through 8th grade learned the importance of family farms and farmers and how to teach agricultural lessons to their students.

  • New local scholarship to reward good deeds

    From release

    A new scholarship opportunity including a mentoring component has been established for local high school juniors.
    The Lancaster County Good Samaritan Scholarship was founded in April by Lancaster native and retired business owner Marion Taylor. It is modeled after the Bill Maness Good Samaritan Scholarship Foundation of Atlanta, of which Taylor was a founding member.

  • Way behind schedule

    Van Wyck Elementary School, which was originally supposed to be finished by June 8, won’t be ready for building inspections until at least Aug. 2, and school officials are worried about it being completed by the start of the school year.
    Jimmy Wilhide, senior architect with Moseley Architects of Charlotte, blames a lack of contractors and large amounts of rain at the work site this year.

  • Schools OK spending plan

    The school board Tuesday night unanimously passed a $110.6 million budget for fiscal 2018-19 that includes pay raises and an increase in per-pupil funding.
    The budget, which is up $7.9 million from this year, has a 1-percent raise for all Lancaster County School District employees except substitute teachers and miscellaneous hourly workers.
    Homeowners will see a property tax decrease from the budget, but there’s a tax increase for business owners.

  • David Platts named county’s 2018 conservation educator

    From release

    David Platts has been named Lancaster County’s 2018 Conservation Educator of the Year.

    The award was presented May 17 at the Lancaster Soil and Water Conservation District’s Annual Affiliate Members Awards and Recognition Program.

    Each year, the soil and water conservation district recognizes a teacher in Lancaster County who is doing an outstanding job educating students about the importance of our natural resources. 

  • Beth Blum returns to LCSD, this time at Brooklyn Springs

    Beth Blum is back.
    The longtime Indian Land Elementary School principal, who retired in May, has changed her mind and will return to the school district as principal of Brooklyn Springs Elementary.
    “They gave me an opportunity to come back… so I did,” Blum said Thursday. “I’m glad to be here, and lots of teachers have already come over to see me. It’s a wonderful opportunity.
    “And I’m only 52. I’m too young to retire,” she joked.
    And the school district is happy to have her back.

  • Life-or-death moments await trainees at S.C. Fire Academy

    A small group of firefighters, already drenched in sweat from the heat outdoors, run headfirst into an even hotter burning building, wearing full turnout gear and carrying a heavy hose filled with water.
    Working together using quick, precise movements, they blast water onto the blaze, as if they’ve been doing this for years.
    But they’re 17- and 18-year-old rookie firefighting trainees, still in high school.