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Education

  • Shark Week
  • Spotlight on Brooklyn Springs' Jacobs

    A Lancaster County teacher was recognized this week for her work as a DonorsChoose ambassador, helping other educators raise funds for their classrooms.
    Stephanie Jacobs, instructional technology coach at Brooklyn Springs Elementary School, was interviewed Tuesday for a project to be featured on the DonorsChoose website and social media. It includes female STEM teachers from different school districts across the country.
    Jacobs was the only teacher interviewed in South Carolina.

  • IL sign-language students give up hearing for a day

    A group of Indian Land High students gave up their hearing for one day last month, wearing noise-canceling hearing aids as part of a sign-language class offered at the school.
    The school’s sign-language teacher, Dennis Bivins, said he felt it was important for students to experience what people who are deaf go through every day.

  • AJ runner-up at state drama fest

    Chloë Mungo
    For The Lancaster News
    Andrew Jackson High School’s theater students brought home second place at the annual Palmetto Dramatic Association State Theatre Festival, which took place at Winthrop University last weekend.
    “I’m just on cloud nine,” said Katrina Bernsdorff, AJ’s drama teacher, still in awe of her students’ performance.

  • Camping at the lake

    Campfires with s’mores, the great outdoors, fresh air and fun activities – for many kids, this is just a normal part of their childhood.
    But for other kids, camping trips are just something they read about in books.
    At Lake Wylie, YMCA Camp Thunderbird hosts hundreds of kids from all over the county each year. But students at Brooklyn Springs Elementary in Lancaster were missing out due to the Title 1 school’s lack of fundraising options to finance the trip.

  • Raise the Rucker roof!

    A.R. Rucker Middle School had a lot to celebrate Friday, and it did so at maximum volume.
    Both the girls and boys basketball teams and the football team were recognized for undefeated seasons, and students more than doubled their goal of raising items for the local warming center.
    Screaming middle-schoolers packed the gym bleachers, cheering for players as their names were announced over the loudspeaker.

  • Phoenix Café debuts

    The culinary arts kitchen at the Lancaster County Career Center was abuzz late Friday morning, and will continue to stay busy every other Friday with the grand opening of The Phoenix Café.
    The café, named after the new school mascot, features made-from-scratch meals prepared in-house by students, and serves the staff at Lancaster High School, the school district HQ and the career center.
    Chef Scott Michaw is at the helm in the kitchen, with more than 10 years of experience as a professional chef, and he said his students love this opportunity to cook.

  • Marking 100th school day with myriad lessons, parties

    Elementary students across the Lancaster County School District celebrated the 100th day of school Thursday, marking another day closer to the warmth and freedom of summer.
    Students celebrated in a variety of ways, including participating in lessons and games involving the number 100, like stacking 100 cups and finding 100 hidden items. Some students at Brooklyn Springs Elementary wore colored headbands with the number 100 on them.
    For the Discovery School, their hallways switched from schoolhouse to convalescent home, when students dressed up as 100 year olds.

  • Dancing With the Stars

    Indian Land is known for its explosive residential and industrial growth, but now the Panhandle can also be known for its first-ever duo to take part in Lancaster County’s Dancing With the Stars.
    Archie Walker, owner of Archie Boy’s Texas Style Barbeque, and Melissa Prince, INSP vice president of corporate communications, are eagerly prepping for February’s competition, and have already enjoyed every minute with their student coaches.

  • North Star fosters lifelong learners

    Stephanie Jadrnicek
    For The Lancaster News

    When Cat Maas was pregnant with her first child, she began considering her daughter’s future school options. She didn’t think public school was the right fit for her family, and she longed for an educational setting with more freedom and creativity.