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Education

  • School registration dates set

    Lancaster County School District

    Lancaster County School District has set registration dates for the 2018-19 school year.

    No general school fees will be charged this year, although fees may be charged for activities such as band, driver education, clubs and yearbooks.

    School insurance will not be sold during registration.

    What students new to a school must bring

  • Lancaster teacher to show students how we get food

    From release

    FLORENCE – Lisa Huss, a teacher at Lancaster’s South Middle School, was among 49 S.C. educators who recently learned how to bring agriculture into their classrooms.

    The South Carolina Farm Bureau Federation (SCFB) hosted its annual Ag in the Classroom Summer Teacher Institute June 18-22 in Florence,  where teachers from pre-K through 8th grade learned the importance of family farms and farmers and how to teach agricultural lessons to their students.

  • Way behind schedule

    Van Wyck Elementary School, which was originally supposed to be finished by June 8, won’t be ready for building inspections until at least Aug. 2, and school officials are worried about it being completed by the start of the school year.
    Jimmy Wilhide, senior architect with Moseley Architects of Charlotte, blames a lack of contractors and large amounts of rain at the work site this year.

  • New local scholarship to reward good deeds

    From release

    A new scholarship opportunity including a mentoring component has been established for local high school juniors.
    The Lancaster County Good Samaritan Scholarship was founded in April by Lancaster native and retired business owner Marion Taylor. It is modeled after the Bill Maness Good Samaritan Scholarship Foundation of Atlanta, of which Taylor was a founding member.

  • David Platts named county’s 2018 conservation educator

    From release

    David Platts has been named Lancaster County’s 2018 Conservation Educator of the Year.

    The award was presented May 17 at the Lancaster Soil and Water Conservation District’s Annual Affiliate Members Awards and Recognition Program.

    Each year, the soil and water conservation district recognizes a teacher in Lancaster County who is doing an outstanding job educating students about the importance of our natural resources. 

  • NASC honors the life, work of Will Goins

    Family, friends and admirers gathered Thursday evening for the opening reception of the new exhibit “Artist, Advocate & Leader: Celebrating the Life and Work of Dr. Will Moreau Goins” at USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center.

    Visitors wandered around the colorful exhibit, examining the variety of art on display, including photography, paintings, regalia and beadwork, before hearing a few words about the artist from the center’s director, Dr. Stephen Criswell.

  • School board raises prices for lunches, sports events

    The Lancaster County school board had a busy meeting Tuesday night, voting unanimously to raise prices for student lunches and athletic-event tickets and to change the elementary school grading period to nine weeks.
    All athletic tickets will go up $1, across the district, for the 18-19 school year. Coaches originally asked for a $2 raise, but settled with the district on a $1 increase.
    According to school officials at the meting, coaches need more money to support their teams, and raising ticket prices would help them meet that goal.

  • Once, twice, sold

    It was a typical adrenaline-filled scene in the auction business – auctioneers rolling numbers off their tongues at unintelligible rates, and the audience shouting out bids in rapid succession.

    Except this time, those bidder’s yells came from second graders at Brooklyn Springs Elementary School.

    Auctioneers Larry Cauthen and Richard Patterson managed the rambunctious crowd in Teresa Guenther’s classroom, and Doug Barfield, from the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office, kept all the bidders civil. 

  • AJMS reopens Tuesday, new traffic pattern

    Andrew Jackson Middle School is reopening Tuesday, eight weeks after a fire that started in a janitor’s closet caused extensive damaged to the school. 

    “Tuesday, our students will walk into a shiny, refurbished Andrew Jackson Middle – thoroughly scrubbed, new paint, new ceiling tiles and like-new cafeteria,” Superintendent Jonathan Phipps said. 

  • Delay on Buford multipurpose building

    The Buford High School multipurpose building is 24 days behind schedule and will not be completed in time for graduation.

    The new target for completion is mid-June.

    School board Chairman Bobby Parker had promised his constituents that the room would be completed on time to be used for the class of 2018’s graduation. He was not pleased with the news.