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Education

  • Traffic-route delays plague

    The new but incomplete traffic pattern at two Buford schools caused quite a stir Monday, but school officials promised the situation will get better, blaming construction delays on heavy summer rains and unexpected underground obstacles at the site.

    School board Chairman Bobby Parker said LCI-Lineberger Construction, the company doing the work at the schools, should not be held responsible for the delay.

  • Vespe named Buford High’s valedictorian

    After graduating as salutatorian from Buford High School at the end of the school year, Kaitlyn Vespe was surprised to see that one of the grades on her school transcript was wrong.
    That grade, when corrected, makes Vespe her school’s valedictorian instead.
    “I was still happy to graduate as salutatorian,” Vespe said this week, but noted that she is relieved that the mistake has now been corrected and she has an updated transcript and a valedictorian medal.

  • Miss S.C.’s mission: STEM education

    Chris Worthy
    Clemson University
    CLEMSON – Students and faculty in Clemson University’s College of Science already have a favorite in the Miss America competition – and the date and location of the event haven’t even been announced yet.

  • Pilot program helps high school grads take their next steps

    Stephanie Jadrnicek
    stephaniej@thelancasternews.com
    Alongside partners, community leaders and friends, the J. Marion Sims Foundation recently celebrated the launch of the Furman College Advising Corps’ third year in Lancaster and Chester counties.
    Chester and Lancaster counties serve as the S.C. pilot for the College Advising Corps – a national service program affiliated with AmeriCorps dedicated to helping students plan for college and career readiness.

  • Anna Bagby wins fire chiefs’ scholarship

    Anna Bagby, 22, was surprised July 25 to find out she was the lone recipient of a $2,000 scholarship from the Lancaster County Fire Chiefs Association this year.
    Bagby was told the news during the monthly Fire Chiefs Association meeting. The annual scholarship is usually split among multiple students, but Bagby, a Lancaster High School graduate, was the only one to apply this year.
    “It feels a little crazy,” she said of finding out she would receive an additional $1,000.

  • York Tech to ex-students: Come back and finish up

    Brian Garner
    Landmark News Service
    Former York Tech students, the school is calling you. No, you don’t still owe anything for that library book, the college wants you to come back to campus and finish your degree or certification.
    And they’re even willing to pay for it.

  • Clemson’s annual private donations top $176M

    Tara Romanella
    Clemson University
    CLEMSON – Clemson University had another record-breaking year in fundraising, with $176 million received from private gifts and IPTAY support during the fiscal year that ended June 30.

  • Rockets Away Day Camp

    Bailey Milhorn
    For The Lancaster News
    The Rockets Away Day Camp was held July 18 at First Baptist Church in Lancaster from 2:30-4:30 p.m.
    The camp is offered by 4-H, a positive youth development organization in Lancaster and Chester County that leads several programs including clubs and projects in animal agriculture, natural resources and the environment, gardening, leadership and citizenship and science technology and engineering.

  • Lancaster County public school registration kicks off

    Lancaster County School District
    Lancaster County School District has set registration dates for the 2019-20 school year.
    No general school fees will be charged this year, although fees may be charged for activities such as band, driver’s education ($50), high school art  ($10), clubs and yearbooks. School insurance will not be sold during registration.
    New students

  • Science study with creative flair

    The Lancaster County Council of the Arts kicked off its Arts & Sciences Camp this week to engage kids’ minds throughout the summer.
    “It’s arts and sciences with a health and wellness component added,” arts council Executive Director Debbie Jaillette said. “We believe that summer learning is important for kids.”