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Education

  • School board raises prices for lunches, sports events

    The Lancaster County school board had a busy meeting Tuesday night, voting unanimously to raise prices for student lunches and athletic-event tickets and to change the elementary school grading period to nine weeks.
    All athletic tickets will go up $1, across the district, for the 18-19 school year. Coaches originally asked for a $2 raise, but settled with the district on a $1 increase.
    According to school officials at the meting, coaches need more money to support their teams, and raising ticket prices would help them meet that goal.

  • Once, twice, sold

    It was a typical adrenaline-filled scene in the auction business – auctioneers rolling numbers off their tongues at unintelligible rates, and the audience shouting out bids in rapid succession.

    Except this time, those bidder’s yells came from second graders at Brooklyn Springs Elementary School.

    Auctioneers Larry Cauthen and Richard Patterson managed the rambunctious crowd in Teresa Guenther’s classroom, and Doug Barfield, from the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office, kept all the bidders civil. 

  • AJMS reopens Tuesday, new traffic pattern

    Andrew Jackson Middle School is reopening Tuesday, eight weeks after a fire that started in a janitor’s closet caused extensive damaged to the school. 

    “Tuesday, our students will walk into a shiny, refurbished Andrew Jackson Middle – thoroughly scrubbed, new paint, new ceiling tiles and like-new cafeteria,” Superintendent Jonathan Phipps said. 

  • Delay on Buford multipurpose building

    The Buford High School multipurpose building is 24 days behind schedule and will not be completed in time for graduation.

    The new target for completion is mid-June.

    School board Chairman Bobby Parker had promised his constituents that the room would be completed on time to be used for the class of 2018’s graduation. He was not pleased with the news. 

  • Special-needs class getting all-out prom

    Erin Walker and Shana Beckham, teachers at Lancaster High School, have taken it upon themselves to give their special-needs class a prom night they won’t forget. 

    “They don’t get the experience everyone else does, like with a limo or anything. They go in a school bus,” Walker said. 

    Beckham agreed.

    “We wanted to make it like everyone else’s, and make it special,” Beckham said. 

  • Oh, yuck! Sewer glitch earns Erwin kids day off

    Erwin Elementary School was closed for repairs Friday after a sewage backup the day before affected half the school.
    Two classrooms and the teacher’s conference room actually had raw sewage on the floors.
    “It really isn’t that bad. Our plumbers probably made a bigger mess trying to fix it” said school district Facilities Director David Small.

  • Mentors by chance

    A month after a fire shut down Andrew Jackson Middle School for repairs, its displaced seventh graders have taken on an unexpected role – becoming mentors to the students at Kershaw Elementary School. 

    “It’s been amazing. The kids are enjoying the older students,” said Leslie Bass, a first-grade teacher at KES. “We had one student struggling with math, and the seventh grader sat down and tutored them. 

  • Crook makes dance team at Limestone

    Ashley Lowrimore

    For The Lancaster News

    Senior Jessica Crook is not only the first Indian Land High School student to receive a dance scholarship to Limestone College, but also the first to earn a spot on the school’s dance team.

    In early March, Crook signed with the Gaffney-area college for a scholarship that will cover partial costs for her four years of education.

  • New rules on advancing to next grade

    The Lancaster County school board has changed the requirements for high school students to advance to the next grade level, hoping to prevent anyone from finishing 12th grade without being able to graduate. 

    The board voted unanimously to revert to the district’s previous policy from 13 years ago, which requires completion of certain math and English courses for a student to move to the next grade.  

  • AJMS students, teachers adapt to temporary quarters after fire

    Chloe Mungo

    For The Lancaster News

    The Andrew Jackson Volunteer community is living up to its name yet again.

    After the March 1 fire at Andrew Jackson Middle School, nearby schools have been helping out to house the middle schoolers while the building gets repaired.

    The sixth graders are currently housed at Heath Springs Elementary, the seventh graders at Kershaw Elementary and the eighth graders at Andrew Jackson High.