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Education

  • Local students attend FFA convention

    From release

    The National FFA Organization held the 91st National FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Ind. in November.  FFA members from Andrew Jackson High School were among the more than 63,000 members and guest that attended this year’s annual event.

  • LCSD construction projects still on schedule despite rain

    The Lancaster County School District’s construction projects are moving ahead as scheduled, with only minor delays due to this past month’s frequent rains.
    Contractors have been working extra hours to keep the schedules on track.
    “They’re working weekends and overtime to make up for the weather days,” said LCSD Facilities Director David Small.
    At the new Indian Land High School site, rock removal has also contributed to construction delays with more rocks having to be removed than anticipated.

  • Truckload of generosity

    Brooklyn Springs Elementary was transformed into Santa’s grotto Thursday after 100 volunteers from Keller Williams Fort Mill, decked out as elves and reindeer, showed up to spread some Christmas cheer.
    This is the third year that the Texas-based real estate company has organized a Christmas event for the school. The company provided a holiday shop where children could pick two presents to give to their loved ones, in a truck parked in the school parking lot.

  • Clinton Elementary robotics team takes Judges Award

    From release

    Clinton Elementary School’s 21st Century Royal Slayers Robotics Team won the Rising Star Judges Award at the 2018 First Lego League Tournament on Nov. 17.
    “This is a very young, determined, and focused team,” the judges said. “This team is very knowledgeable but had some challenges that they faced.  I believe in a few years, they will be a team that we all will remember.”
    The Royal Slayers competed in the qualifying tournament on Nov. 17 at Saluda Trail Middle School in Rock Hill. 

  • Creating a newspaper written by kids, for kids

    It’s a newspaper like any other, full of articles on current events, sports, science and popular culture.
    But it’s written by a bunch of kids, from kindergartners to high school seniors.
    Last week, Mookie’s Place, an afterschool childcare center in downtown Lancaster, was converted into a newsroom.
    “They’re having a ball,” said Monique Smalls, executive director of the program. “They’re loving it because they get to speak freely. They love the idea of creating something.”

  • Middle schoolers hear vets’ stories

    Veterans Day is often filled with parades, salutes and assemblies aimed at recognizing and honoring those who served in the military, but Indian Land Middle School did something different.
    ILMS brought in over 50 veterans, and asked them to share their service and life experiences with sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders. There was a veteran for every classroom, and some even had two.

    Navy provided his career

  • Hugh Mobley chairs committee looking for USC’s next president

    Lancaster’s Hugh Mobley will chair the search committee to find a successor to Harris Pastides, retiring president of the University of South Carolina.
    Mobley, founder of Mobley Drugs and vice chairman of the USC Board of Trustees, joins 12 others on the search committee.
    Mobley called Pastides, who announced last month that he will retire next year after a decade in the job, a one-of-a-kind leader.

  • New Indian Land PTSO stages "best bonfire ever"

    The new Indian Land High School Parent Teacher Student Organization (PTSO) started this summer under the direction of IL parent Pam Hogue.
    “We just wanted something to help and support the teachers and students,” she said.
    The group organized the annual Homecoming Bonfire Oct. 10. Because of rain, the event moved indoors with no bonfire, but the food trucks and games continued.
    Hogue said ILHS Principal David Shamble approached her about the PTSO taking over the event.

  • IL student took Aviation Challenge last summer

    Huntsville, Ala. – This summer, Sam Scott, 18, of Indian Land attended Aviation Challenge Mach III at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, home of Space Camp, Space Camp Robotics, Aviation Challenge and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center’s Official Visitor Center.
    The week-long educational program for ages 15-18 promotes science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), while training students and adults with hands-on activities and missions based on teamwork, leadership and problem solving.

  • ILES students learn about our continent’s aborigines

    Indian Land Elementary’s cafeteria shook with the steady beat of a Native American drum Monday morning as Little Big Eagle greeted excited third graders, playing his hand-carved, wooden flute.
    More than 50 students sat still, moving only to the beat of the music, as they were transfixed by Little Big Eagle’s playing.
    The 58-year-old Tuscarora Cherokee Indian, dressed in his native regalia, then stopped and faced his audience. With a gentle, deep voice, he greeted them in his native language, and then translated it into English.