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Business

  • Duke upfitting plant to pack more punch

    Jessica Wells
    Duke Energy Illumination
    Inside a mountain beside South Carolina’s Lake Jocassee, Duke Energy’s largest hydro plant is growing.
    Workers at Bad Creek Hydroelectric Station began disassembling the plant in January to install new equipment, including massive spherical valves and three 700,000-pound transformers. Their creative engineering will allow Bad Creek to power roughly 250,000 more homes without building a new plant.

  • Wells Fargo gives $7,500 to greenway

    From release
    Wells Fargo has donated $7,500 to the Lindsay Pettus Greenway to assist with funding the first 2 miles of the planned recreational trail and environmental education center along Gills Creek in Lancaster.
    “We believe that helping our communities become more resilient and better stewards of the environment will improve the long-term quality of life of our customers and team members,” said Lain Reavis of Wells Fargo. “We’re proud to support the Lindsay Pettus Greenway.”

  • Heath Springs upping business-license fees

    HEATH SPRINGS – The town of Heath Springs’ bargain-basement fees for business licenses are on the way out.

    Town council unanimously approved an eight-tiered classification system last week that sets a minimum fee ranging from $35 to $70 based on business type, as well as a rate based on gross income. 

    The new fees take effect May 1, 2019.

  • Still room for vendors at IL Fall Festival

    Chris McGinn

    For The Lancaster News

    When the Indian Land Fall Festival returns Nov. 3-4, visitors will have no shortage of vendors to explore. 

    Want steampunk-inspired jewelry, handmade soap or new gutters for your house? You can find it as you browse the nearly 200 art, craft, business and nonprofit vendors that have signed on for the two-day festival at the Indian Land schools complex. 

  • Comporium donates $150,000 to greenway for STEM project

    From release

    The Lindsay Pettus Greenway has received $150,000 from Comporium Communications to incorporate STEM-related education elements at the greenway’s proposed environmental center.

  • IL Fall Festival countdown begins

    Chris McGinn

    For The Lancaster News

    The Indian Land Fall Festival team marked its official kickoff for the November event at The Ivy Place in Van Wyck on Sept. 8. There are only 45 days left until the big event on Nov. 3-4.

    Nearly 150 Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce members, event planners, sponsors, vendors and volunteers enjoyed a dinner from Archie Boy’s BBQ under the big tent. Organizer Mike Neese thanked participants and gave them an overview for this year’s bigger plans. 

  • Chamber drive nets 30 new members

    The Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce bumped its membership up by almost 10 percent  in its annual membership  drive. 

    “We are excited to welcome 30 new members who have joined the chamber and partner with us to make Lancaster County a better place to live, work and do business,” said Dean Faile, the chamber’s president and CEO.

  • Distribution, manufacturing fuel Fort Lawn resurgence

    Brian Garner

    Landmark News Service

    A quiet revitalization is going on at the four former Springs Industries plants in Fort Lawn, led by Springs Creative CEO Derick Close.

    Close bought the Fort Lawn plants that his family used to own – Elliott, Frances, Leroy and Riverlawn – and has made them the components of Springsteen Logistics, a division of his Springs Creative Group.

  • Gilbert to become master in his field

    Some might rightfully say Jamie Gilbert has already become a “master practitioner” of economic development, but soon he could have a piece of paper certifying it.

    Gilbert, Lancaster County’s economic development director, has been approved for a new and highly selective program for senior-level economic development leaders that should only burnish his skills, and potentially help the county accrue even more business investment in coming years. 

  • County government holding 1st job fair

    With Lancaster County’s low jobless rate and an influx of economic activity, employers are having a hard time filling many positions. 

    The county government is organizing its first-ever job fair for later this month to round up applicants for its own vacancies, which number about 20.