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Faces and Places

  • Could Hunley have saved herself?

    From release

    Had pioneering submariners on the Hunley released the vessel’s keel blocks, the crew might have survived their first Civil War mission. 

    On Feb. 17, 1864, the Hunley became the world’s first successful combat submarine, sinking the U.S.S. Housatonic. 

    Historical records indicate the submarine’s crew signaled to shore they were on the way back home, but instead they vanished without a trace. 

  • Habitat event raises more than $15,000

    Performers brought some toe-tapping good times to USC Lancaster Saturday night for Habitat for Humanity of Lancaster County’s sixth-annual Bluegrass, Barbecue and Building fundraiser. 

    The BBB event raised over $15,000, topping the amount raised last year, said Nita Brown, executive director of the local Habitat chapter. 

  • Local band Sugarshine debuts CD in crowd-pleasing show at Chastain’s

    The Red Rose City was rocking to smooth reggae last weekend, as more than 40 people streamed into Chastain’s Studio Lofts on Main Street to hear Lancaster’s five-man band Sugarshine.

    The roots reggae ensemble are lifelong friends and range in age from 27 to 44. The members have played in various bands together through the years. But this combination seems a bit magical to them.

    “We knew we had something special,” said Stuart Parsons, 41, keyboard player. 

  • Ex-LHS star Ron Trapps comes back home to work for nonprofit

    Former Lancaster High star basketball player Ron Trapps has returned to Lancaster after earning two college degrees to give back to the community where he was raised.

    Trapps, 24, is Palmetto Citizens Against Sexual Assault’s new Engaging Men Project coordinator.

    The result of a three-year, $346,680 federal grant, the Engaging Men Project aims to educate young men on sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking. The grant will fund training, forums and annual men’s conferences.

  • Metal detectors ready to help you

    Vanessa Brewer-Tyson

    Landmark News Service

    If you’ve lost a gold ring or any other valuable metal object, an area metal detecting and relic club may be able to help you.

    Donnie Catoe, president of the Sandhill Metal Detecting and Relic Club in Pageland, said members of the club not only hunt for precious metals and artifacts as a hobby, but also help people in the community find lost objects, whether it be an old high school graduation ring or a precious jewel.

  • Life's lessons on love

    Ollie Alexander has a soothing, calming presence. She seems full of wisdom and humility. She draws you to her, like a warm fire on a winter’s night. 

    Alexander, 68, moves gracefully and quietly through a room. She appears much younger than her age. She commands the language and expresses herself with ease and graceful gestures. She believes she has a God-given purpose and wants to help others discover theirs.

  • My mom knew how to handle mischievous passel of sons

    Kevin Cauthen
    Special to The Lancaster News

    Editor's note: Kevin Cauthen sent us this evocative remembrance of his mother, Barbara Day Cauthen of Heath Springs, who passed away Dec. 31 at age 87.  

    Mom was not one to go out and socialize a lot. The people she was closest to were her family and her many church friends. She loved people and was patient, giving, caring and kind to all.  

  • Big crowd for ‘Milt Chaney’ book signing

    Amanda Harris
    For The Lancaster News

  • 'Nothing better than a homegrown tomato'

    For the past seven years, farming has been a passion for Rachel Hovis. Her work and dedication to farming led her to receive the 2016 American FFA Degree, along with 18 others in the state.
    “It’s the highest honor an FFA member can get,” Hovis said.
    The Future Farmers of America Degree is awarded to students based on their leadership abilities, their participation in at least 50 hours of community service with three different organizations, their supervised agricultural experience and their time and cost investments.

  • Column: Now’s the time to help lawns recover from summer stress

    As summer fades into fall, it’s time to help lawns recover from summer stress and prepare for the winter ahead.

    Keep mowing your lawn as long as it continues to grow. Grow cool-season grasses like bluegrass, fescue and ryegrass, and you want it 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches tall. Warm-season grasses like Bermuda, carpetgrass, centipede and zoysia should be grown at 1 to 2 inches tall while St. Augustine should a bit higher, 2 to 3 inches, for best results.