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Opinion

  • We think there's a major question that County Council members need to consider before they enact more stringent animal-control laws. And that is: Is the county planning to hire more animal-control personnel to make sure that people abide by the rules? We're cynical, so we find ourselves questioning whether there would be any real point to such legislation.

    Council on Monday gave the first of three approvals to an ordinance that would tighten several of the county's animal control laws, including how an owner provides water and shelter for dogs kept outside.

  • Recently looking over some old photographs of downtown and news of the death of an uptown guy sent me down memory lane.

    The death of Frank Ghent took me back in time when downtown was a hopping place in the Red Rose City.

    Mr. Ghent, who died Feb. 26, was one of the two barbers at "the hole," also known as the Friendly Barber Shop.

    The place was quite friendly, but what about "the hole?"

  • This is the last time I am responding about my support of cockfighting unless I am summoned to speak in Columbia. Quite frankly I am tired of repeating myself. I am coughing on all the smoke being used to cloud the true issue.

  • Often when Tigers and Gamecocks meet, somebody's departing in a down mode. Such wasn't the case at the Carole Ray Dowling Health Services Center on the University of South Carolina at Lancaster campus last month.

    When those who bleed garnet and those who have orange in their veins met that day, their smiles were akin to those worn when one state rival downs another.

    The happy event was the check presentations following the sixth annual Big Thursday golf tournament.

  • I have another comment on how cruelty is not right. It could be to a child who has no one to care about him or her or their feelings, whether it be from an arrogant bully at school or an insensitive gossip at work or elsewhere. It could be an elderly person who can't help himself or herself and are at the mercy of someone who has power over them. It could also be to any living being.

    The point seems to be that there are those who love this power over those who can't help themselves.

  • I would like to thank Jensan Louis, "Anti-cockfighters seek to take away rights" in the Feb. 17 edition of The Lancaster News, for bringing up some good points and pointing out how God still had a place 200 years ago. God has a place right here and now and creatures of all kinds belong to him. It is our place to make sure they are cared for. That is exactly what I intend to keep doing.

  • At first read, I felt compelled to jump on the flap wagon protesting the cost of water service from Lancaster County Water and Sewer District.

    For years my monthly bill was much higher than my immediate neighbors. I complained. I got nowhere. Insult came with injury when a goodly portion of my front yard was surrendered to the utilities for water, natural gas and communication services. I hoped my neighbors would understand my sacrifice to their well being.

  • I am sad that it has come to my attention that the Waxhaws Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, has experienced "automatic disbandment" from the National Society.

    Waxhaws Chapter was organized in 1941 with Mrs. E. Lee Skipper as organizing regent.

    Another regent, Mrs. Ben C. Hough Sr., was largely responsible for the establishment of Andrew Jackson State Park.

    Many of the historic markers in Lancaster County are the result of work by the members.

    Constitution Park at the corner of Main Street and Woodland Drive was dedicated by Waxhaws Chapter.

  • I have become aware that there are many cemeteries hidden throughout Lancaster County that are more or less unknown.

    Small cemeteries such as the Baskins Cemetery in Rich Hill and others can provide a wealth of information to researchers with an interest in the folks buried in a family plot or a private cemetery.

    I suspect there are many such cemeteries. You may have stumbled across one in an obscure area or deep in the woods.

  • Well, it's happened again. Despite Indian Land residents now having a different ZIP code than our counterparts across the creek, Fort Mill's Rescue Squad is still hitting us up for donations.

    And it's no wonder Lanny Bernard, director of Lancaster County Emergency Medical Services, is seeing red over the issue.

    Bernard has repeatedly asked Mark Garrick, captain of Fort Mill's Rescue Squad, to stop soliciting from Indian Land residents, whom Fort Mill's squad do not serve, except as a rarely used backup.

  • We are responsible for treatment of animals

    This is in response to Louis Jensan's letter, "Anti-cockfighters seek to take away rights," in the Feb. 17 edition of The Lancaster News. His letter once again makes our county and state look like the guffaw hillbillies that just won't die.

  • February is Black History Month, a time for us to celebrate the contributions of African Americans throughout our history.

    Many pivotal African Americans have exemplified through their lives the power of advocacy and volunteerism, from Frederick Douglass to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Black History Month is a time to reflect on how we can help change the lives of others less fortunate by speaking out on their behalf.

    Everyone can be great because everyone can serve, King said.

  • When you look at a map of the Heritage Tract, you see slivers of property cut out on both sides of the Catawba River in Lancaster and Chester counties and dipping into Fairfield County. The state of South Carolina bought the 1,540-acre tract last fall for $5.4 million.

    The Katawba Valley Land Trust bought 200 acres in the same vicinity from Crescent Resources earlier this year. The nonprofit land trust has received donated conservation easements from Crescent for 161 acres with water frontage on Fishing Creek in Chester County and Camp Creek in Lancaster County.

  • Carter G. Woodson, a noted African American historian and educator, poignantly said, "When you control a man's thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his 'proper place' and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His education makes it necessary."

  • This letter in response to Dave Zoglmans letter "Powers-Norrell throws first dirt in Senate race," printed in the Feb. 20 edition of The Lancaster News. I am a Buford High School senior. Neither my teacher, classmates and I quite understand the article.

    As far as throwing the first dirt goes I think you just did. I challenge you to find one flaw with Mandy Powers-Norrell.

    She was one of the most intelligent who ever graduated from Lancaster High School and the USC School of Law. Our district should be honored that she is representing us.

  • I would like to thank Lancaster residents Mary Reimers "Time to change animal abuse laws" and Barbara Small "Writer proud of legislators for protecting animal rights" and John Goodwin from the U.S. Humane Society for their replies to my letter "Anti-cockfighters seek to take away rights."

    Thanks for proving my point that people are personifying animals with human emotions and souls that they don't have. Thank you for proving that rash emotions are superceding common sense and empathy for your fellow man in regard for laws and accompanying penalties.

  • When Continental Tire suspended production at its Charlotte plant and sent those jobs overseas to Brazil and other countries, scores of Lancaster County residents lost their jobs.

    This created a tax burden on Lancaster County and an impact on commerce when those folks' disposable income was eliminated. Not only that, soon after the production suspension, Continental Tire implemented terms requiring some of their retirees at one point to pay more than $1,600 for health care.

  • They are the first to help after a house fire. They are the first to help after a natural disaster. They provide training for lifeguards who watch our children in area pools.

    They are the staff and highly dedicated volunteers of the American Red Cross.

    They distribute food, clothing and shelter for those who have lost their homes through fire, flood, hurricanes and tornadoes.

    The Lancaster County Chapter of the American Red Cross has provided these services since 1917.

  • Dave Zoglman is wrong to say that Mrs. Mandy Powers-Norrell threw the first dirt in the S.C. Senate seat 16 race.

    Powers-Norrell's statement that every decision she would make as our state senator would be made out of a love for this district and its people first is not from a desire to move up the political ladder.

    I think it was wonderful and refreshing.

    I also know that presidents Washington, Lincoln, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Kennedy and Reagan loved their respective hometowns and first made a difference there before moving on to other political aspirations.

  • Beach trips, no matter the time of year, most often result in fun.

    Buford High School head football coach Mike Wells has a beach business trip planned for next December and he's elated with what's in store.

    Wells, the seven-year head football coach at Buford High School, has been selected as a coach for the annual North-South All-Star football game at Coastal Carolina University.

    Wells will serve as a North assistant for the 61st annual clash.