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Opinion

  • We were actually working on a story about something called “dual office holding” in reference to the Great Falls election when we heard that a protest had been filed in the recent election.

    Two unsuccessful candidates in the Great Falls election filed a protest claiming that Darryl Washington, the top vote getter, is holding dual offices.

    Anyone can file a protest on any issue, but this is not an issue for the Great Falls Election Commission because it is not an election issue.

  • I begin this letter by introducing myself once again as a proud wife and mother, as well as a conservative Republican by choice. I recently commented in The Lancaster News editorial section regarding the upcoming Senate District 16 election setting Rep. Mick Mulvaney, a Republican, against Democratic candidate Mandy Powers-Norrell for the vacated seat in November. Apparently, my letter stirred some attention to this race.

  • When asked what the major issue facing our district, Mandy Powers-Norrell answered, “The threat of school vouchers.” School vouchers?

    Was that really her answer or was it a misprint by The Lancaster News to make her look foolish and out of touch with the citizens of Lancaster?

    With Lancaster County unemployment at 9.9 percent, I doubt the threat of school vouchers is keeping those affected up at night. My guess is they are worried if they will be able to find a job.

  • We would like to thank the Raos, the Lancaster County Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Committee, the sponsors and all who contributed to the law officers memorial in any way. We were so pleased with the memorial service and dedication on April 16 and honored that our dad, B. Frank Sowell’s name was placed on such a beautiful monument. Thank you all for such a wonderful tribute to these fallen officers.

    The Sowell family (Reba Sowell Hallman)

    Lancaster

  • Lancaster County is known as a place where caring and giving people live. Those with even a slight hint of doubt about the citizens of Lancaster County need to be at Lancaster Memorial Stadium on Friday night.

    Your doubt will fade as the sun sinks and droves of people file in to continue to battle cancer.

    That’s when the annual Relay for Life unfolds. The stadium is spacious and that’s good because Relay draws a packed field as people from all walks of life gather to continue the fight to defeat cancer.

  • Something needs to be done about littering in the southern end of our town. I live in this part of town near the projects.

    Ride down these streets any time of day or night and you will see liquor bottles, beer bottles, diapers, marijuana bags, couches and mattresses strewn in ditches.

    After I got home from work Tuesday, someone had discarded a headboard in the ditch behind my home. A little way down the street are piles of trash and mattresses that have been there for months.

  • More than 50 years ago, a man known as a philanthropist, textile magnate and World War II ace pilot wanted to help his employees come out from under the throes of finance companies high interest rates.

    Springs Mills owner Col. Elliott White Springs knew that many of his employees were borrowing money from finance companies that were “very prevalent and unregulated.”

    At that time, banks were not into consumer lending.

  • What is a dangerous dog? Is it fair to categorize certain breeds as dangerous? Can you spot a dangerous dog just by looking at him? Can anybody?

    These are some of the questions that County Council members have been grappling with since they began looking at adopting an animal-control ordinance that primarily targets man’s best friend.

  • I would like to express a few concerns that I’ve had regarding the recent public education attacks on my friend Mick Mulvaney.

    Mick is one of the most honest and straightforward people I have ever met. What you see is what you get. Our friendship has grown even fonder over the past couple of years while working for the citizens of Lancaster and York counties in Columbia.

  • Family Promise is moving along quite nicely in its seventh month of this journey. eeMuch progress in all areas has been achieved and the latest accomplishment is the Family Promise of Lancaster County Web site.

    Most people in America are able to connect to the Web and I’m sure the same is true for Lancaster County citizens.

    Family Promise wants to make it easy for people to learn about and  understand what Family Promise is and what it will mean for Lancaster County.

  • Sexual assault is a social problem that affects every community in our nation. It affects children, women and men. It does not matter the age, religion, socioeconomic status. Rape is the most under -reported crime in America.

    Rape requires more than pointing out the problem. Rape requires a communitywide partnership and focusing on the victims.

  • Years ago when I was a youngster, I heard older folks grumbling about all kinds of stuff. Seems like back then our politicians took time to listen and some wrongs were corrected or made a little easier for us.

  • I am writing in response to David Cook’s column, “Vouchers take money away from public schools,” in the April 11 edition of The Lancaster News.

    How selfish must you be to block financial aid to parents who wish to send their kids to a conducive place to learn. Last time I checked, there were parents who had to transfer their kids from public to private schools because of disciplinary problems. And there are parents who want a clean Christian education, sheltered from the ungodliness in our local schools.

  • Six years ago, Lancaster residents Sal and Lois Rao, reacting to a family tragedy, could have just faded away in their grief.

    One would understand, but the Raos, despite their loss, opted to go another direction following the death of their son, senior state trooper Mike Rao.

    Rao, while on duty in June of 2002 in Clarendon County, was hit by a car and later died as a result of his injuries.

    The Raos decided to make something positive out of their situation.

  • This is in response to Wynette Birchfield’s column “Vouchers make education equal” in the April 4 edition of The Lancaster News.

  • On a recent Sunday, my family went to several different restaurants before we gave up on eating out. Why? Like 3 million other Americans, my son, Joel, has a peanut allergy.

    According to the Mayo Clinic, allergic reactions to peanuts are the most severe of all food allergies followed by shellfish, fish, tree-nuts and eggs. Peanut allergies are responsible for 80 percent of fatal or near-fatal reactions each year.

  • Shag Club grateful for support

    I would like to thank all of you who came out to support the Lancaster Shag Club’s Spaghetti fundraiser dinner March 30.

    Our chef, Tom Ulrich, cooked up some awesome homemade spaghetti sauce, and our hard-working crew of volunteers saw to it that everyone had plenty to eat. Many of our club members, who are not only good dancers, but great cooks, brought delicious homemade desserts to add to your meals.

  • I’m so tired of hearing about all the money and effort in regards to animal fighting. Dog, chicken, cat, fish, bug etc. Want to know what I want to hear? I want to hear about programs for people like me – born and raised here, love my state and yet left behind.

    I’m 31, single and make less than $25,000 a year. My daughter, mother, father, brother and I all live in the same rented home to try and make ends meet.

  • I read with interest your article of last week concerning Dr. John Catalano, dean at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster and his great plans for enhancing that institution's collegiate atmosphere, something we've needed for half a century now.

    And if anyone can do it, John can. He and I were office mates (of sorts) for some 20 years before my retirement. Believe me, over a period of 20 years, you get to know someone very well. Believe me, John was always far too lively to be the "teacher's pet." The trips he made to the office were not to receive awards.

  • In a perfect world there would be no need for a cancer radiation treatment center. But this is not a perfect world. And there are many Lancaster County residents who need radiation treatment. To get that treatment, they have to travel to Rock Hill, Charlotte or Columbia.

    If you or someone you love has gone through radiation treatment, you know it drains your energy. Driving out of town to get this treatment adds to an already stressful situation. Some people have chosen not to take the treatment because of the drive.